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Compensation for "Meaningful Participation" in Climate Change Control: A Modest Proposal and Empirical Analysis


  • Panayotou, Theodore
  • Sachs, Jeffrey D.
  • Zwane, Alix Peterson


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  • Panayotou, Theodore & Sachs, Jeffrey D. & Zwane, Alix Peterson, 2002. "Compensation for "Meaningful Participation" in Climate Change Control: A Modest Proposal and Empirical Analysis," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 437-454, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeeman:v:43:y:2002:i:3:p:437-454

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gene M. Grossman & Alan B. Krueger, 1995. "Economic Growth and the Environment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(2), pages 353-377.
    2. Larsen, Bjorn & Shah, Anwar, 1994. "Global Tradeable Carbon Permits, Participation Incentives, and Transfers," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(0), pages 841-856, Supplemen.
    3. Schelling, Thomas C, 1992. "Some Economics of Global Warming," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 1-14, March.
    4. Rose, Adam, 1998. "Burden-sharing and climate change policy beyond Kyoto: implications for developing countries," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 3(03), pages 347-409, July.
    5. John Luke Gallup & Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew D. Mellinger, 1998. "Geography and Economic Development," NBER Working Papers 6849, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Richard Schmalensee & Thomas M. Stoker & Ruth A. Judson, 1998. "World Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 1950-2050," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(1), pages 15-27, February.
    7. Angelsen, Arild & Kaimowitz, David, 1999. "Rethinking the Causes of Deforestation: Lessons from Economic Models," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 14(1), pages 73-98, February.
    8. John Luke Gallup & Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew D. Mellinger, 1998. "Geography and Economic Development," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1856, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    9. Cropper, Maureen & Griffiths, Charles, 1994. "The Interaction of Population Growth and Environmental Quality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 250-254, May.
    10. Jyoti Parikh & P. G. Babu & K. S. Kavi Kumar, 1997. "Climate Change, North-South Co-Operation And Collective Decision-Making Post-Rio," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(3), pages 403-413.
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    Cited by:

    1. Wolfgang Buchholz & Wolfgang Peters, 2005. "A Rawlsian Approach to International Cooperation," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(1), pages 25-44, February.
    2. Meckler, Sacha Rene, 2017. "Causes and Impacts of Deficient Liability for Climate Change Damage, and an Economic Conception for Climate Change Liability That Supports Appropriate Action: DRaCULA," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 288-298.
    3. Jianglong Li & Boqiang Lin, 2016. "Green Economy Performance and Green Productivity Growth in China’s Cities: Measures and Policy Implication," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(9), pages 1-21, September.
    4. repec:spr:grdene:v:18:y:2009:i:4:d:10.1007_s10726-008-9144-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Marco Grasso, 2004. "A Normative Framework of Justice in Climate Change," Working Papers 79, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Jul 2004.
    6. Auffhammer, Maximilian & Carson, Richard T., 2008. "Forecasting the path of China's CO2 emissions using province-level information," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 229-247, May.
    7. Steve Suranovic, 2011. "Addicted to Oil: Implications for Climate Change Policy," Working Papers 2011-22, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    8. Marco Grasso, 2006. "An Ethics-based Climate Agreement for the South Pacific Region," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 6(3), pages 249-270, September.
    9. Akpalu, Wisdom & Anders, Ekbom, 2010. "Bio-economics of Conservation Agriculture and Soil Carbon Sequestration in Developing Countries," Working Papers in Economics 431, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    10. Markandya, Anil, 2011. "Equity and Distributional Implications of Climate Change," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 1051-1060, June.

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