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Experience conditioning in commuter modal choice modelling – Does it make a difference?

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  • Hensher, David A.
  • Ho, Chinh Q.

Abstract

This paper investigates the impact of decision maker’s experience on model elasticities and predicted market share, using data collected in Sydney on commuter mode choice. Usage frequency is used as a proxy for experience and two separate mode choice models are estimated – one with experience conditioning choice and one without. Key model outputs are compared and we find that differences in the value of travel time savings and model elasticities are very marked. This suggests that ignoring experience that one has with each alternative in their choice set may be a candidate source of error in travel demand forecasts. We develop a method to obtain the level of experience for use in application of choice models to increase their prediction power.

Suggested Citation

  • Hensher, David A. & Ho, Chinh Q., 2016. "Experience conditioning in commuter modal choice modelling – Does it make a difference?," Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 164-176.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transe:v:95:y:2016:i:c:p:164-176
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tre.2016.09.010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Neuman, Tzahi & Neuman, Einat & Neuman, Shoshana, 2010. "Explorations of the effect of experience on preferences for a health-care service," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 407-419, June.
    2. Eran Ben-Elia & Ido Erev & Yoram Shiftan, 2008. "The combined effect of information and experience on drivers’ route-choice behavior," Transportation, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 165-177, March.
    3. Swait, Joffre & Adamowicz, Wiktor, 2001. " The Influence of Task Complexity on Consumer Choice: A Latent Class Model of Decision Strategy Switching," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 28(1), pages 135-148, June.
    4. Hess, Stephane & Rose, John M. & Hensher, David A., 2008. "Asymmetric preference formation in willingness to pay estimates in discrete choice models," Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(5), pages 847-863, September.
    5. Mandy Ryan & Cristina Ubach, 2003. "Testing for an experience endowment effect in health care," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(7), pages 407-410.
    6. David A. Hensher & John M. Rose, 2012. "The Influence of Alternative Acceptability, Attribute Thresholds and Choice Response Certainty on Automobile Purchase Preferences," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, University of Bath, vol. 46(3), pages 451-468, September.
    7. Swait, Joffre & Adamowicz, Wiktor, 2001. "Choice Environment, Market Complexity, and Consumer Behavior: A Theoretical and Empirical Approach for Incorporating Decision Complexity into Models of Consumer Choice," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 86(2), pages 141-167, November.
    8. Hensher,David A. & Rose,John M. & Greene,William H., 2015. "Applied Choice Analysis," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9781107465923, April.
    9. David Hensher & William Greene, 2003. "The Mixed Logit model: The state of practice," Transportation, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 133-176, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hensher, David A. & Ho, Chinh Q. & Liu, Wen, 2016. "How much is too much for tolled road users: Toll saturation and the implications for car commuting value of travel time savings?," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 604-621.
    2. repec:eee:transe:v:105:y:2017:i:c:p:18-38 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Balbontin, Camila & Hensher, David A. & Collins, Andrew T., 2017. "Integrating attribute non-attendance and value learning with risk attitudes and perceptual conditioning," Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 172-191.

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