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Reducing Australian motor vehicle greenhouse gas emissions

Author

Listed:
  • Stanley, John
  • Ellison, Richard
  • Loader, Chris
  • Hensher, David

Abstract

Australians are one of the world’s highest per capita emitters of greenhouse gases, yet the country’s target for emissions reductions by 2030 remains modest. This paper looks at policy options for Australian cities to deliver faster emissions reductions than the national commitment level. The main focus is on an accelerated reduction in emissions from urban road transport, through technological improvements and behaviour changes. Targets are proposed for improved emissions intensities, to bring Australia much closer to US and EU performance expectations. A range of behaviour change measures is then tested on Melbourne and Sydney, the Sydney analysis using MetroScan-TI, an integrated evaluation framework, to explore how behaviour changes might enhance emissions outcomes. The potential contribution of public transport is a particular focus. The paper concludes that, with sufficient political will, Australia could reduce its 2030 road transport emissions to 40% below 2005 levels. This is a much larger reduction than the current 26–28% Australian target but is more consistent with longer term pathways to acceptable carbon budgets.

Suggested Citation

  • Stanley, John & Ellison, Richard & Loader, Chris & Hensher, David, 2018. "Reducing Australian motor vehicle greenhouse gas emissions," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 76-88.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:109:y:2018:i:c:p:76-88
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2018.01.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ellison, Richard B. & Ellison, Adrian B. & Greaves, Stephen P. & Sampaio, Breno, 2017. "Electronic ticketing systems as a mechanism for travel behaviour change? Evidence from Sydney’s Opal card," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 80-93.
    2. Hickman, Robin & Ashiru, Olu & Banister, David, 2010. "Transport and climate change: Simulating the options for carbon reduction in London," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 110-125, March.
    3. Peter Stopher & John Stanley, 2014. "Introduction to Transport Policy," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 15102.
    4. Stanley, John K. & Hensher, David A. & Loader, Chris, 2011. "Road transport and climate change: Stepping off the greenhouse gas," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(10), pages 1020-1030.
    5. Iankov, Ivan & Taylor, Michael A.P. & Scrafton, Derek, 2017. "Forecasting greenhouse gas emissions performance of the future Australian light vehicle traffic fleet," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 125-146.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bhardwaj, Chandan & Axsen, Jonn & Kern, Florian & McCollum, David, 2020. "Why have multiple climate policies for light-duty vehicles? Policy mix rationales, interactions and research gaps," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 309-326.
    2. Siskos, Pelopidas & Moysoglou, Yannis, 2019. "Assessing the impacts of setting CO2 emission targets on truck manufacturers: A model implementation and application for the EU," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 125(C), pages 123-138.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate change; Fuel tax; Greenhouse gas emissions; Emissions intensity; Travel behaviour change; Vehicle kilometres travel;

    JEL classification:

    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise
    • R42 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government and Private Investment Analysis; Road Maintenance; Transportation Planning
    • R48 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government Pricing and Policy

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