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Electronic ticketing systems as a mechanism for travel behaviour change? Evidence from Sydney’s Opal card

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  • Ellison, Richard B.
  • Ellison, Adrian B.
  • Greaves, Stephen P.
  • Sampaio, Breno

Abstract

Smartcard and other forms of electronic ticketing have become integral to modern public transport systems. While aggregate ridership figures have generally been positive, little is known about the drivers behind these changes because of a lack of travel information on individuals before and after implementation of such systems. The current paper presents analysis from a naturalistic travel behaviour study of inner-city Sydney residents that coincided with the phased introduction of the Opal smartcard system. Using a differences-in-differences methodology, results indicate significant reductions in car use of around 10min/day with commensurate increases in train use and incidental walking. This trend holds across income groups and is more pronounced for older residents. Results add further weight to the merits of simplifying ticket purchasing as part of a package of policy measures designed to increase public transport usage.

Suggested Citation

  • Ellison, Richard B. & Ellison, Adrian B. & Greaves, Stephen P. & Sampaio, Breno, 2017. "Electronic ticketing systems as a mechanism for travel behaviour change? Evidence from Sydney’s Opal card," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 80-93.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:99:y:2017:i:c:p:80-93
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2017.03.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    2. Stanley, John & Ellison, Richard & Loader, Chris & Hensher, David, 2018. "Reducing Australian motor vehicle greenhouse gas emissions," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 76-88.

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