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The impact of therapeutic procedure innovation on hospital patient longevity: Evidence from Western Australia, 2000–2007

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  • Lichtenberg, Frank R.

Abstract

Assessing the benefits of medical innovation—its impact on health outcomes—is as important as assessing the costs—its impact on health expenditure. Most formal studies have focused on the expenditure impacts of medical technology, partly because costs are more easily identified and quantified than are benefits. Moreover, most quantitative research relating to the impact of broad categories of technology on health outcomes has focused on pharmaceuticals. This is the first study that investigates the benefits and costs of another broad category of medical innovation—inpatient therapeutic procedure innovation—using data on over one million hospital discharges.

Suggested Citation

  • Lichtenberg, Frank R., 2013. "The impact of therapeutic procedure innovation on hospital patient longevity: Evidence from Western Australia, 2000–2007," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 50-59.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:77:y:2013:i:c:p:50-59
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.11.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Frank R. Lichtenberg & Gautier Duflos, 2008. "Pharmaceutical innovation and the longevity of Australians: a first look," NBER Working Papers 14009, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Jonathan S. Skinner & John Wennberg, 2000. "How Much Is Enough? Efficiency and Medicare Spending in the Last Six Months of Life," NBER Chapters,in: The Changing Hospital Industry: Comparing For-Profit and Not-for-Profit Institutions, pages 169-194 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Adriana Lleras-Muney & Frank R. Lichtenberg, 2010. "Are the More Educated More LIkely to Use New Drugs?," NBER Chapters,in: Contributions in Memory of Zvi Griliches, pages 671-696 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Frank Lichtenberg, 2011. "The quality of medical care, behavioral risk factors, and longevity growth," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 11(1), pages 1-34, March.
    5. Productivity Commission, 2005. "Impacts of Advances in Medical Technology in Australia," Research Reports, Productivity Commission, Government of Australia, number 17.
    6. Frank Lichtenberg, 2012. "Contribution of Pharmaceutical Innovation to Longevity Growth in Germany and France, 2001–7," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 197-211, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hostenkamp, Gisela & Lichtenberg, Frank R., 2015. "The impact of recent chemotherapy innovation on the longevity of myeloma patients: US and international evidence," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 162-171.
    2. Spyros Arvanitis & Euripidis N. Loukis, 2014. "Investigating the effects of ICT on innovation and performance of European hospitals," KOF Working papers 14-366, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
    3. Lichtenberg, Frank R. & Tatar, Mehtap & Çalışkan, Zafer, 2014. "The effect of pharmaceutical innovation on longevity, hospitalization and medical expenditure in Turkey, 1999–2010," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 117(3), pages 361-373.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Australia; Longevity; Mortality; Innovation; Hospital;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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