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Change in psychological distress in response to changes in reduced mobility during the early 2020 COVID-19 pandemic: Evidence of modest effects from the U.S

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  • Devaraj, Srikant
  • Patel, Pankaj C.

Abstract

During the early 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, several US states had implemented stay-in-place orders (SIPOs) with varying degrees of stringency which resulted in inter-state differences in mobility (i.e., longer presence at home). We test whether the inter-state differences in mobility influenced changes in reported psychological distress. Our study is not on the surge in COVID-19 in the later part of 2020.

Suggested Citation

  • Devaraj, Srikant & Patel, Pankaj C., 2021. "Change in psychological distress in response to changes in reduced mobility during the early 2020 COVID-19 pandemic: Evidence of modest effects from the U.S," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 270(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:270:y:2021:i:c:s0277953620308340
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2020.113615
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