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How painful is a recession? An assessment of two future-oriented buffering mechanisms

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  • Wilkinson, Lindsay R.
  • Schafer, Markus H.
  • Wilkinson, Renae

Abstract

Guided by stress process theory, this study investigates the association between the economic downturn and chronic pain interference, as well as the role of two future-oriented buffering mechanisms (anticipated stressor duration and pre-recession financial optimism) in this relationship. This research integrates both an objective measure of the recession based on negative personal experiences, as well as subjective event-based appraisals of how the recession impacted people's lives.

Suggested Citation

  • Wilkinson, Lindsay R. & Schafer, Markus H. & Wilkinson, Renae, 2020. "How painful is a recession? An assessment of two future-oriented buffering mechanisms," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 255(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:255:y:2020:i:c:s0277953619304496
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2019.112455
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kim, Taehoon & Kim, Jinho, 2020. "Linking adolescent future expectations to health in adulthood: Evidence and mechanisms," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 263(C).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic recession; Stress process; Appraisals; Pain;

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