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Externalities of openness in innovation

  • Roper, Stephen
  • Vahter, Priit
  • Love, James H.

Discussion of open innovation has typically stressed the benefits to the individual enterprise from boundary-spanning linkages and improved internal knowledge sharing. In this paper we explore the potential for wider benefits from openness in innovation and argue that openness may itself generate positive externalities by enabling improved knowledge diffusion. The potential for these (positive) externalities suggests a divergence between the private and social returns to openness and the potential for a sub-optimal level of openness where this is determined purely by firms’ private returns. Our analysis is based on Irish plant-level panel data from manufacturing industry over the period 1994–2008. Based on instrumental variables regression models our results suggest that externalities of openness in innovation are significant and that they are positively associated with firms’ innovation performance. We find that these externality effects are unlikely to work through their effect on the spread of open innovation practices. Instead, they appear to positively influence innovation outputs by either increasing knowledge diffusion or strengthening competition. Our evidence on the significance of externalities from openness in innovation provides a rationale for public policy aimed at promoting open innovation practices among firms.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Research Policy.

Volume (Year): 42 (2013)
Issue (Month): 9 ()
Pages: 1544-1554

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Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:42:y:2013:i:9:p:1544-1554
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/respol

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