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Return mobility and scientific productivity of researchers working abroad: The role of home country linkages

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  • Baruffaldi, Stefano H.
  • Landoni, Paolo

Abstract

Through an analysis of 497 foreign researchers in Italy and Portugal we verify the impact of home linkages on return mobility choices and scientific productivity. We consider the presence of several different types of linkages of the researchers working abroad with their country of origin and control for the most relevant contextual factors (age, research area, position in the host country, etc.). The probability of return to their home country and scientific productivity in the host country are both higher for researchers that maintain home linkages. We conclude that the presence of home linkages directly benefits both countries in addition to the indirect benefit of expanding the scientific networks. Policy implications and suggestions for further research are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Baruffaldi, Stefano H. & Landoni, Paolo, 2012. "Return mobility and scientific productivity of researchers working abroad: The role of home country linkages," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(9), pages 1655-1665.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:41:y:2012:i:9:p:1655-1665
    DOI: 10.1016/j.respol.2012.04.005
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    1. repec:eee:respol:v:47:y:2018:i:5:p:886-900 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Baruffaldi, Stefano H. & Di Maio, Giorgio & Landoni, Paolo, 2017. "Determinants of PhD holders’ use of social networking sites: An analysis based on LinkedIn," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 740-750.
    3. Conchi, Sonia & Michels, Carolin, 2014. "Scientific mobility: An analysis of Germany, Austria, France and Great Britain," Discussion Papers "Innovation Systems and Policy Analysis" 41, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).
    4. Gibson, John & McKenzie, David, 2014. "Scientific mobility and knowledge networks in high emigration countries: Evidence from the Pacific," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(9), pages 1486-1495.
    5. Qin, Fei, 2015. "Global talent, local careers: Circular migration of top Indian engineers and professionals," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 405-420.
    6. Li, Feng & Miao, Yajun & Yang, Chenchen, 2015. "How do alumni faculty behave in research collaboration? An analysis of Chang Jiang Scholars in China," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 438-450.
    7. Callaert, Julie & Landoni, Paolo & Van Looy, Bart & Verganti, Roberto, 2015. "Scientific yield from collaboration with industry: The relevance of researchers’ strategic approaches," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(4), pages 990-998.
    8. Fernandez-Zubieta, Ana & Geuna, Aldo & Lawson, Cornelia, 2015. "What do We Know of the Mobility of Research Scientists and of its Impact on Scientific Production," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201522, University of Turin.
    9. repec:spr:scient:v:101:y:2014:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-014-1307-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Jewell, Sarah & Kazakis, Pantelis, 2017. "On the Role of Migration on the Satisfaction of European Researchers: Evidence from MORE2," MPRA Paper 86149, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 11 Apr 2018.
    11. Francesco LISSONI, 2016. "Migration and Innovation Diffusion : An Eclectic Survey," Cahiers du GREThA 2016-11, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    12. Maki Kato & Asao Ando, 2017. "National ties of international scientific collaboration and researcher mobility found in Nature and Science," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 110(2), pages 673-694, February.
    13. Sultan Orazbayev, 2017. "Diversity and collaboration in Economics," UCL SSEES Economics and Business working paper series 2017-4, UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES).
    14. Lepori, B. & Seeber, M. & Bonaccorsi, A., 2015. "Competition for talent. Country and organizational-level effects in the internationalization of European higher education institutions," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 789-802.
    15. Shibayama, Sotaro & Baba, Yasunori, 2015. "Impact-oriented science policies and scientific publication practices: The case of life sciences in Japan," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(4), pages 936-950.
    16. repec:nbr:nberch:14104 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Baruffaldi, Stefano & Visentin, Fabiana & Conti, Annamaria, 2016. "The productivity of science & engineering PhD students hired from supervisors’ networks," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 785-796.

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