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Demand articulation in emerging technologies: Intermediary user organisations as co-producers?

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  • Boon, Wouter P.C.
  • Moors, Ellen H.M.
  • Kuhlmann, Stefan
  • Smits, Ruud E.H.M.

Abstract

User involvement is assumed to be beneficial to innovation processes. Intermediary user organisations contribute to articulating societal demands for innovations. However, the learning processes inside these organisations are still not understood well. Therefore, this paper empirically investigates intermediaries using an event history approach. It yields characteristic learning mechanisms, e.g. concerning the management of expectations or actively building a case. If intermediaries overcome challenges regarding positioning, representation and the level of proactivity, they can play a precarious role in demand articulation in the context of new technologies.

Suggested Citation

  • Boon, Wouter P.C. & Moors, Ellen H.M. & Kuhlmann, Stefan & Smits, Ruud E.H.M., 2011. "Demand articulation in emerging technologies: Intermediary user organisations as co-producers?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 242-252, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:40:y:2011:i:2:p:242-252
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:eee:respol:v:47:y:2018:i:1:p:70-87 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Takey, Silvia Mayumi & Carvalho, Marly M., 2016. "Fuzzy front end of systemic innovations: A conceptual framework based on a systematic literature review," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 97-109.
    3. Elberse, Janneke Elisabeth & Pittens, Carina Anna Cornelia Maria & de Cock Buning, Tjard & Broerse, Jacqueline Elisabeth Willy, 2012. "Patient involvement in a scientific advisory process: Setting the research agenda for medical products," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 107(2), pages 231-242.
    4. Koen Frenken, 2016. "A Complexity-Theoretic Perspective on Innovation Policy," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1619, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Aug 2016.
    5. Schweisfurth, Tim G. & Raasch, Christina, 2015. "Embedded lead users—The benefits of employing users for corporate innovation," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 168-180.
    6. repec:eee:enepol:v:108:y:2017:i:c:p:684-695 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Allan Dahl Andersen & Per Dannemand Andersen, 2016. "Foresighting for Inclusive Development," Working Papers on Innovation Studies 20160115, Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, University of Oslo.
    8. Paula Kivimaa & Wouter Boon & Sampsa Hyysalo & Laurens Klerkx, 2017. "Towards a Typology of Intermediaries in Transitions: a Systematic Review," SPRU Working Paper Series 2017-17, SPRU - Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Sussex.
    9. Kivimaa, Paula, 2014. "Government-affiliated intermediary organisations as actors in system-level transitions," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(8), pages 1370-1380.
    10. Schleich, Joachim & Walz, Rainer & Ragwitz, Mario, 2017. "Effects of policies on patenting in wind-power technologies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 684-695.

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