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Technological agglomeration and the emergence of clusters and networks in nanotechnology

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  • Robinson, Douglas K.R.
  • Rip, Arie
  • Mangematin, Vincent

Abstract

Based on the analysis of two clusters in nanotechnologies (MESA+ in the Netherlands and Minatec in Grenoble in France), the paper examines the emergence and effects of technological agglomeration. The social and technical arrangements of a regional centre for nanotechnology both enable and constrain the ongoing activities and research lines that can be followed. Technology platforms and their co-location are a pre-requisite for nanotechnology research and agglomeration of such platforms are both a means and outcome for institutional entrepreneurs to mobilise resources, build networks and construct regional centres of excellence in nanotechnology. Technological agglomeration shapes the networks that evolve and leads to the convergence of scientific disciplines.
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  • Robinson, Douglas K.R. & Rip, Arie & Mangematin, Vincent, 2007. "Technological agglomeration and the emergence of clusters and networks in nanotechnology," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 871-879, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:36:y:2007:i:6:p:871-879
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    1. Jeff S. Armstrong & Michael R. Darby & Lynne G. Zucker, 2003. "Commercializing knowledge: university science, knowledge capture and firm performance in biotechnology," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Sep, pages 149-170.
    2. Avenel, E. & Favier, A.V. & Ma, S. & Mangematin, V. & Rieu, C., 2007. "Diversification and hybridization in firm knowledge bases in nanotechnologies," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 864-870, July.
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    4. Mangematin, V. & Rip, A. & Delemarle, A. & Robinson, D.K.R., 2005. "The role of regional institutional entrepreneurs in the emergence of clusters in nanotechnologies," Working Papers 200515, Grenoble Applied Economics Laboratory (GAEL).
    5. Eric Avenel & Anne-Violaine Favier & Simon Ma & Vincent Mangematin & Carole Rieu, 2007. "Diversification and hybridization in firm knowledge bases in nanotechnologies," Post-Print hal-00424531, HAL.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • M13 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - New Firms; Startups

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