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Performance competition in local media markets

  • Revelli, Federico

This paper investigates the impact of tax and public service performance on English local government popularity by using data on local property taxes, service performance ratings and local election results after the introduction of a system of evaluation of local government performance (Comprehensive Performance Assessment). The evidence emerging from estimation of a re-election equation offers a somewhat more rounded portrait of the voter than the conventional fiscal conservative icon, by highlighting the beneficial consequences of public service performance on government popularity and pointing to the role of local media networks (the BBC regional television, local radio and web network) in shaping consensus by spreading tax-related information.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Public Economics.

Volume (Year): 92 (2008)
Issue (Month): 7 (July)
Pages: 1585-1594

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Handle: RePEc:eee:pubeco:v:92:y:2008:i:7:p:1585-1594
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505578

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  16. Revelli, Federico, 2007. "Local media networks and social spending: Evidence from the UK," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 96(1), pages 144-149, July.
  17. Revelli, Federico & Tovmo, Per, 2007. "Revealed yardstick competition: Local government efficiency patterns in Norway," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 121-134, July.
  18. Jinyong Hahn & Jerry Hausman, 2002. "A New Specification Test for the Validity of Instrumental Variables," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(1), pages 163-189, January.
  19. Núria Bosch & Albert Solé, 2004. "Yardstick competition and the political costs of raising taxes: An empirical analysis of Spanish municipalities," Working Papers 2004/5, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
  20. Federico Revelli, 2004. "Performance Rating and Yardstick Competition in Social Service Provision," CESifo Working Paper Series 1270, CESifo Group Munich.
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  24. Rivers, Douglas & Vuong, Quang H., 1988. "Limited information estimators and exogeneity tests for simultaneous probit models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 347-366, November.
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