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Inflation, inflation uncertainty and output growth in the USA


  • Bhar, Ramprasad
  • Mallik, Girijasankar


Employing a multivariate EGARCH-M model, this study investigates the effects of inflation uncertainty and growth uncertainty on inflation and output growth in the United States. Our results show that inflation uncertainty has a positive and significant effect on the level of inflation and a negative and significant effect on the output growth. However, output uncertainty has no significant effect on output growth or inflation. The oil price also has a positive and significant effect on inflation. These findings are robust and have been corroborated by use of an impulse response function. These results have important implications for inflation-targeting monetary policy, and the aim of stabilization policy in general.

Suggested Citation

  • Bhar, Ramprasad & Mallik, Girijasankar, 2010. "Inflation, inflation uncertainty and output growth in the USA," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 389(23), pages 5503-5510.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:phsmap:v:389:y:2010:i:23:p:5503-5510 DOI: 10.1016/j.physa.2010.06.063

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mustafa Caglayan & Ozge Kandemir & Kostas Mouratidis, 2011. "Real effects of inflation uncertainty in the US," Working Papers 2011002, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Feb 2015.
    2. Lahmiri, Salim, 2017. "Cointegration and causal linkages in fertilizer markets across different regimes," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 471(C), pages 181-189.


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