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Deposit rate ceilings and monetary transmission in the US

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  • Mertens, Karel

Abstract

Establishing the existence and nature of changes in the conduct and transmission of monetary policy is key in understanding the remarkable macroeconomic performance of the US since the mid-1980s. This paper presents evidence on a phenomenon of disintermediation occurring during the major recessions in the 1960s and 1970s, but absent ever since, and shows that disintermediation is closely linked to the existence of deposit rate ceilings under regulation Q. In a monetary DSGE model that incorporates deposit rate ceilings as occasionally binding constraints, the regulation alters the behavior of money aggregates and exacerbates the drop in economic activity following a monetary tightening. The results of a threshold VAR lend support to the main theoretical predictions of the model.

Suggested Citation

  • Mertens, Karel, 2008. "Deposit rate ceilings and monetary transmission in the US," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(7), pages 1290-1302, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:moneco:v:55:y:2008:i:7:p:1290-1302
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    Cited by:

    1. Boris Hofmann & Gert Peersman, 2017. "Monetary Policy Transmission and Trade-offs in the United States: Old and New," CESifo Working Paper Series 6745, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Hjortsoe, Ida & Weale, Martin & Wieladek, Tomasz, 2016. "Monetary Policy and the Current Account: Theory and Evidence," CEPR Discussion Papers 11204, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Eickmeier, Sandra & Hofmann, Boris, 2013. "Monetary Policy, Housing Booms, And Financial (Im)Balances," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 17(04), pages 830-860, June.
    4. Meeks, Roland, 2012. "Do credit market shocks drive output fluctuations? Evidence from corporate spreads and defaults," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 568-584.
    5. Apergis, Nicholas & Polemis, Michael, 2018. "Electricity supply shocks and economic growth across the US states: evidence from a time-varying Bayesian panel VAR model, aggregate and disaggregate energy sources," MPRA Paper 84954, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Tomas Havranek & Marek Rusnak, 2013. "Transmission Lags of Monetary Policy: A Meta-Analysis," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 9(4), pages 39-76, December.
    7. Lenno UUSKÜLA, "undated". "Limited Participation or Sticky Prices? New Evidence from Firm Entry and Failures," EcoMod2008 23800147, EcoMod.
    8. Roland Meeks, 2009. "Credit market shocks: evidence from corporate spreads and defaults," Working Papers 0906, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    9. Wieladek, Tomasz, 2016. "The varying coefficient Bayesian panel VAR model," Bank of England working papers 578, Bank of England.
    10. Koch, Christoffer, 2015. "Deposit interest rate ceilings as credit supply shifters: Bank level evidence on the effects of Regulation Q," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 316-326.
    11. Robert L. Hetzel, 2009. "Should increased regulation of bank risk-taking come from regulators or from the market?," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Spr, pages 161-200.

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