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Social status and long-run effects of monetary policy in a two-sector monetary economy of endogenous growth

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  • Chen, Hung-Ju

Abstract

We develop a two-sector monetary economy with human capital accumulation and a cash constraint applied to both consumption and investment to examine the ways in which social status affects the impact of monetary policy on the long-run economic growth rate. Our findings suggest that the formation of human capital is an important determinant to the super-neutrality of money in the growth-rate sense. Within an economy with Lucas-type human capital formation, money is super-neutral; however, within an economy where human capital accumulation formation is more generalized, and in which both physical and human capital are used as inputs, the growth rate in money will have a negative effect on the long-run growth rate of the economy. The existence, uniqueness and saddle-path stability of balanced-growth equilibrium are also examined.

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  • Chen, Hung-Ju, 2011. "Social status and long-run effects of monetary policy in a two-sector monetary economy of endogenous growth," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 71-79, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:matsoc:v:61:y:2011:i:1:p:71-79
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    Cited by:

    1. Hung-Ju Chen, 2012. "Social status, human capital formation and the long-run effects of money," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 105(3), pages 225-246, April.
    2. Chen, Hung- Ju, 2011. "Social status, human capital formation and super-neutrality in a two-sector monetary economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 785-794, May.

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