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Labor unions and productivity: An empirical analysis using Japanese firm-level data

  • Morikawa, Masayuki

This paper empirically analyzes the relationship between labor union and firm performance in areas such as productivity and profitability by using data on more than 4000 Japanese firms, ranging from listed large firms to unlisted SMEs, in both the manufacturing and non-manufacturing sector. The presence of labor unions has statistically and economically significant positive effects on firm productivity. Unions' effects on wages are also positive, their magnitude being slightly larger than those on productivity. The decrease in the number of employees is greater at unionized firms than at non-unionized firms. The difference in employment growth is mainly attributable to the change in the number of part-time workers. In order to enhance productivity, close cooperation between management and unions is essential.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VFD-4YG7JT5-1/2/d25bcbf66553c73be352a05029b183e8
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Labour Economics.

Volume (Year): 17 (2010)
Issue (Month): 6 (December)
Pages: 1030-1037

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Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:17:y:2010:i:6:p:1030-1037
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/labeco

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