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Effect of immigrant nurses on labor market outcomes of US nurses

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  • Kaestner, Robert
  • Kaushal, Neeraj

Abstract

We study the effect of immigration of foreign-trained, registered nurses (RNs) on the employment and wages of US-trained RNs. We use the “area” approach and study effects of immigration in labor markets defined by the state. We find substantial evidence that immigration by foreign-trained nurses increases the supply of nurses and that this increase in supply is associated with a decrease in annual earnings. Estimates suggest that a 10% increase in supply due to immigration is associated with a 1–4% decrease in annual earnings, although most estimates were not statistically significant and we did not find a similar association between an increase in supply and wages.

Suggested Citation

  • Kaestner, Robert & Kaushal, Neeraj, 2012. "Effect of immigrant nurses on labor market outcomes of US nurses," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 219-229.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:71:y:2012:i:2:p:219-229
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jue.2011.11.002
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:ilo:ilowps:485561 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Michel Grignon & Yaw Owusu & Arthur Sweetman, 2013. "The international migration of health professionals," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 4, pages 75-97 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Wickramasekara, Piyasiri., 2014. "Assessment of the impact of migration of health professionals on the labour market and health sector performance in destination countries," ILO Working Papers 994855613402676, International Labour Organization.
    4. Cortés, Patricia & Pan, Jessica, 2014. "Foreign nurse importation and the supply of native nurses," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 164-180.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration; Nurses; Wages; Employment;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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