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Policy measures in the deleveraging process: A macroprudential evaluation

Author

Listed:
  • Bole, Velimir
  • Prašnikar, Janez
  • Trobec, Domen

Abstract

This paper evaluates post-crisis effects of deleveraging policy in Slovenia. Reductions in banks’ credits to nonfinancial sectors were driven by increased collateralization, credit rationing, and a neglect of cash flow performance of banking clients. These jeopardized the normal deleveraging of companies with positive cash flows, and rolling over credits, which stifled economic growth. Erroneous sequencing, timing, and calibration of measures steering the deleveraging process generated these processes. Optimal deleveraging process demands that the Central Bank also focus on the stability of the financial system. This task should be a constitutional part of the third macro policy pillar, namely macroprudential policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Bole, Velimir & Prašnikar, Janez & Trobec, Domen, 2014. "Policy measures in the deleveraging process: A macroprudential evaluation," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 410-432.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:36:y:2014:i:2:p:410-432
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jpolmod.2014.01.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kiyotaki, Nobuhiro & Moore, John, 1997. "Credit Cycles," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(2), pages 211-248, April.
    2. Olivier J. Blanchard & Daniel Leigh, 2013. "Growth Forecast Errors and Fiscal Multipliers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 117-120, May.
    3. Andreas Charitou & Evi Neophytou & Chris Charalambous, 2004. "Predicting corporate failure: empirical evidence for the UK," European Accounting Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 465-497.
    4. Marcus Miller & Joseph Stiglitz, 2010. "Leverage and Asset Bubbles: Averting Armageddon with Chapter 11?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(544), pages 500-518, May.
    5. Olivier J Blanchard & Giovanni Dell'Ariccia & Paolo Mauro, 2013. "Rethinking Macro Policy II; Getting Granular," IMF Staff Discussion Notes 13/003, International Monetary Fund.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:jpolmo:v:40:y:2018:i:4:p:790-809 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Polona Domadenik & Janez Prašnikar & Jan Svejnar, 2016. "Political Connectedness, Corporate Governance, and Firm Performance," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 139(2), pages 411-428, December.
    3. Koman, Matjaž & Lakićević, Milan & Prašnikar, Janez & Svejnar, Jan, 2015. "Asset stripping and firm survival in mass privatization: Testing the Hoff-Stiglitz and Campos-Giovannoni models in Montenegro," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 274-289.
    4. repec:eee:jpolmo:v:40:y:2018:i:1:p:118-135 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Balance sheet crisis; Collateral; Deleveraging; Cash flow; Banks; Illiquidity;

    JEL classification:

    • E61 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Policy Objectives; Policy Designs and Consistency; Policy Coordination
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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