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Monetary policy implementation in an interbank network: Effects on systemic risk

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  • Bluhm, Marcel
  • Faia, Ester
  • Krahnen, Jan Pieter

Abstract

This paper makes a conceptual contribution to the e ffect of monetary policy on financial stability. We develop a microfounded network model with endogenous network formation to analyze the impact of central banks' monetary policy interventions on systemic risk. Banks choose their portfolio, including their borrowing and lending decisions on the interbank market, to maximize profit subject to regulatory constraints in an asset-liability framework. Systemic risk arises in the form of multiple bank defaults driven by common shock exposure on asset markets, direct contagion via the interbank market, and firesale spirals. The central bank injects or withdraws liquidity on the interbank markets to achieve its desired interest rate target. A tension arises between the bene ficial effects of stabilized interest rates and increased loan volume and the detrimental effects of higher risk taking incentives.We fi nd that central bank supply of liquidity quite generally increases systemic risk.

Suggested Citation

  • Bluhm, Marcel & Faia, Ester & Krahnen, Jan Pieter, 2014. "Monetary policy implementation in an interbank network: Effects on systemic risk," SAFE Working Paper Series 46, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:safewp:46
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kiyotaki, Nobuhiro & Moore, John, 1997. "Credit Cycles," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(2), pages 211-248, April.
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    3. Hamilton, James D, 1996. "The Daily Market for Federal Funds," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(1), pages 26-56, February.
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    6. Hans Degryse & Grégory Nguyen, 2007. "Interbank Exposures: An Empirical Examination of Contagion Risk in the Belgian Banking System," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 3(2), pages 123-171, June.
    7. Bartolini, Leonardo & Bertola, Giuseppe & Prati, Alessandro, 2002. "Day-to-Day Monetary Policy and the Volatility of the Federal Funds Interest Rate," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 34(1), pages 137-159, February.
    8. Nikola Tarashev & Claudio Borio & Kostas Tsatsaronis, 2009. "The systemic importance of financial institutions," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hüser, Anne-Caroline, 2015. "Too interconnected to fail: A survey of the interbank networks literature," SAFE Working Paper Series 91, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    2. Bluhm, Marcel, 2015. "Interbank funding as insurance mechanism for (persistent) liquidity shocks," SAFE Working Paper Series 117, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    3. repec:eee:finsta:v:36:y:2018:i:c:p:246-262 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Souza, Sergio Rubens Stancato de, 2016. "Capital requirements, liquidity and financial stability: The case of Brazil," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 179-192.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    network formation; contagion; central banks' interventions;

    JEL classification:

    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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