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Countries Of Former Yugoslavia: Periphery Vs. Super-Periphery In The Great Recession And Beyond

Author

Listed:
  • Velimir Bole
  • Miha Dominko
  • Ada Guštin Habuš
  • Janez Prašnikar

Abstract

The paper deals with the performance of former Yugoslav countries during the Great Recession. It compares the performance of peripheral countries (Slovenia and Croatia) with those of super-peripheral countries (Bosnia, the Republic of North Macedonia, Montenegro, and Serbia). The focus of the analysis is the four channels of crisis transmission and ampli-fication: the capital surge as the external channel on the one hand, and the financial accelerator, the banking credit extension, and liquidity as internal channels on the other. While the external channel drove the dynamics of the crisis, the internal chan-nels amplified, broadened, and prolonged its drastic economic consequences. The paper depicts the trajectory of the conse-quences of the Great Recession for both peripheral and super-peripheral countries. It shows that, regarding financial stability, peripheral countries outperformed super-peripheral countries in the boom phase, but not in the bust and recovery phases. The crucial factor influencing such a dete-rioration of peripheral countries’ financial stability was the policy measures enforced by the European Commission and ECB, calibrated to the needs of the largest and strongest economies of the euro area, while neglecting the asymmetric dynamics of Eu-ropean economies in the bust and recovery phases. The paper concludes with a warn-ing that something similar could happen in the present crisis triggered by the Covid-19 virus.

Suggested Citation

  • Velimir Bole & Miha Dominko & Ada Guštin Habuš & Janez Prašnikar, 2019. "Countries Of Former Yugoslavia: Periphery Vs. Super-Periphery In The Great Recession And Beyond," Economic Annals, Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade, vol. 64(223), pages 11-38, October –.
  • Handle: RePEc:beo:journl:v:64:y:2019:i:223:p:11-38
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    indebtedness; investments; bank lending; credit supply and demand; capital flows;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F44 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Business Cycles
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises

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