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Current account adjustments in OECD countries revisited: The role of the fiscal stance

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  • Theofilakou, Nancy
  • Stournaras, Yannis

Abstract

This paper revisits the adjustment path of key economic and financial indicators during large current account adjustment episodes in OECD countries, after controlling for discretionary fiscal policy behavior. We find that the drivers of current account deficit reversals differ according to the fiscal policy stance. In economies with expansionary fiscal policies, external sector adjustment is driven by cyclical and credit factors. In economies implementing fiscal consolidation, adjustment is triggered by fiscal and financial factors, while the disruptive effects of the adjustment are smaller. We conclude that fiscally challenged economies facing external imbalances could ameliorate the adjustment path through fiscal consolidation policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Theofilakou, Nancy & Stournaras, Yannis, 2012. "Current account adjustments in OECD countries revisited: The role of the fiscal stance," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 719-734.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:34:y:2012:i:5:p:719-734
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jpolmod.2011.12.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hughes Hallett, Andrew & Martinez Oliva, Juan Carlos, 2015. "The importance of trade and capital imbalances in the European debt crisis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 229-252.
    2. Trachanas, Emmanouil & Katrakilidis, Constantinos, 2013. "The dynamic linkages of fiscal and current account deficits: New evidence from five highly indebted European countries accounting for regime shifts and asymmetries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 502-510.
    3. Wong Hock Tsen, 2014. "External Balance And Budget In Malaysia," Asian Academy of Management Journal of Accounting and Finance (AAMJAF), Penerbit Universiti Sains Malaysia, vol. 10(2), pages 37-54.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fiscal policy; Current account adjustment; Event study analysis; Multinomial discrete choice modeling;

    JEL classification:

    • F32 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Current Account Adjustment; Short-term Capital Movements
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities

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