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Sustainable supply chain management and the transition towards a circular economy: Evidence and some applications

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  • Genovese, Andrea
  • Acquaye, Adolf A.
  • Figueroa, Alejandro
  • Koh, S.C. Lenny

Abstract

In the last decades, green and sustainable supply chain management practices have been developed, trying to integrate environmental concerns into organisations by reducing unintended negative consequences on the environment of production and consumption processes. In parallel to this, the circular economy discourse has been propagated in the industrial ecology literature and practice. Circular economy pushes the frontiers of environmental sustainability by emphasising the idea of transforming products in such a way that there are workable relationships between ecological systems and economic growth. Therefore, circular economy is not just concerned with the reduction of the use of the environment as a sink for residuals but rather with the creation of self-sustaining production systems in which materials are used over and over again.

Suggested Citation

  • Genovese, Andrea & Acquaye, Adolf A. & Figueroa, Alejandro & Koh, S.C. Lenny, 2017. "Sustainable supply chain management and the transition towards a circular economy: Evidence and some applications," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 66(PB), pages 344-357.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jomega:v:66:y:2017:i:pb:p:344-357
    DOI: 10.1016/j.omega.2015.05.015
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    References listed on IDEAS

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