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A meta-analytic investigation of virtuality and information sharing in teams

  • Mesmer-Magnus, Jessica R.
  • DeChurch, Leslie A.
  • Jimenez-Rodriguez, Miliani
  • Wildman, Jessica
  • Shuffler, Marissa
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    We uncover new insights on the role of virtuality on team information sharing. A new two-dimensional conceptualization of information sharing (Mesmer-Magnus & DeChurch, 2009) enabled us to reconcile past inconsistencies in the virtual team literature. Recasting the findings of 94 studies (total number of groups = 5596; total N approximately = 19,702) into this framework reveals three key insights. First, virtuality improves the sharing of unique information, but hinders the openness of information sharing. Second, unique information sharing is more important to the performance of face-to-face teams than is open information sharing, whereas open information sharing is more important to the performance of virtual teams than is unique information sharing. Third, the effects of virtuality on information sharing are more curvilinear than linear - such that low levels of virtuality improve information sharing, but high levels hider it. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0749597811000434
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

    Volume (Year): 115 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 2 (July)
    Pages: 214-225

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jobhdp:v:115:y:2011:i:2:p:214-225
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/obhdp

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    1. Henry, Rebecca A., 1995. "Improving Group Judgment Accuracy: Information Sharing and Determining the Best Member," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 190-197, May.
    2. van Ginkel, Wendy P. & van Knippenberg, Daan, 2008. "Group information elaboration and group decision making: The role of shared task representations," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 105(1), pages 82-97, January.
    3. Alge, Bradley J. & Wiethoff, Carolyn & Klein, Howard J., 2003. "When does the medium matter? Knowledge-building experiences and opportunities in decision-making teams," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 26-37, May.
    4. Wilson, Jeanne M. & Straus, Susan G. & McEvily, Bill, 2006. "All in due time: The development of trust in computer-mediated and face-to-face teams," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 99(1), pages 16-33, January.
    5. Jonathon N. Cummings, 2004. "Work Groups, Structural Diversity, and Knowledge Sharing in a Global Organization," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 50(3), pages 352-364, March.
    6. Valacich, Joseph S. & Schwenk, Charles, 1995. "Devil's Advocacy and Dialectical Inquiry Effects on Face-to-Face and Computer-Mediated Group Decision Making," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 158-173, August.
    7. Hollingshead, Andrea B., 1996. "The Rank-Order Effect in Group Decision Making," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 181-193, December.
    8. Siegel, Jane & Dubrovsky, Vitaly & Kiesler, Sara & McGuire, Timothy W., 1986. "Group processes in computer-mediated communication," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 157-187, April.
    9. Baltes, Boris B. & Dickson, Marcus W. & Sherman, Michael P. & Bauer, Cara C. & LaGanke, Jacqueline S., 2002. "Computer-Mediated Communication and Group Decision Making: A Meta-Analysis," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 156-179, January.
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