IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jmacro/v32y2010i1p405-414.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Relative price convergence among US cities: Does the choice of numeraire city matter?

Author

Listed:
  • Chmelarova, Viera
  • Nath, Hiranya K.

Abstract

Using annual consumer price index (CPI) data for 17 US cities between 1918 and 2007, this paper examines the implications of the choice of numeraire city for the behavior of relative prices across cities. A common factor representation of relative price is used to understand the nature of the dynamic behavior of relative prices. This paper finds overwhelming evidence of convergence in relative prices with Atlanta, Chicago, and Los Angeles as the numeraire city. Further, with Boston, Cincinnati, Houston, San Francisco, Seattle, and St. Louis, the lack of convergence in relative prices is found to be driven by the nonstationarity of the common factor. In contrast, with New York, Philadelphia, and Portland, while the common factor is stationary, the idiosyncratic components are unit root processes. This paper further investigates the implications of the choice of numeraire city by estimating the half-life with different numeraire cities, after correcting for the small-sample and the time aggregation bias. These half-life estimates are smaller than those reported in previous studies and they vary depending on the choice of numeraire city. The relative price volatility seems to hold some promise for explaining why the choice of numeraire city matters for the unit root results or the half-life estimates.

Suggested Citation

  • Chmelarova, Viera & Nath, Hiranya K., 2010. "Relative price convergence among US cities: Does the choice of numeraire city matter?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 405-414, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:32:y:2010:i:1:p:405-414
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0164-0704(09)00068-8
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Josep LluIs Carrion-I-Silvestre & Tomas Del Barrio & Enrique Lopez-Bazo, 2004. "Evidence on the purchasing power parity in a panel of cities," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(9), pages 961-966.
    2. Jean Imbs & Haroon Mumtaz & Morten O. Ravn & Hélène Rey, 2005. "PPP Strikes Back: Aggregation And the Real Exchange Rate," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(1), pages 1-43.
    3. Chi-Young Choi & Nelson C. Mark & Donggyu Sul, 2004. "Bias Reduction by Recursive Mean Adjustment in Dynamic Panel Data Models," Econometrics 0409005, EconWPA.
    4. Engel, Charles & Rogers, John H, 1996. "How Wide Is the Border?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(5), pages 1112-1125, December.
    5. Jushan Bai & Serena Ng, 2002. "Determining the Number of Factors in Approximate Factor Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(1), pages 191-221, January.
    6. Stephen G. Cecchetti & Nelson C. Mark & Robert J. Sonora, 2002. "Price Index Convergence Among United States Cities," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 43(4), pages 1081-1099, November.
    7. Hiranya K. Nath & Jayanta Sarkar, 2009. "Unbiased Estimation of the Half-Life to Price Index Convergence among U.S. Cities," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 41(5), pages 1041-1046, August.
    8. Jushan Bai & Serena Ng, 2004. "A PANIC Attack on Unit Roots and Cointegration," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(4), pages 1127-1177, July.
    9. M. Hashem Pesaran, 2007. "A simple panel unit root test in the presence of cross-section dependence," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(2), pages 265-312.
    10. Robert J. Sonora, 2005. "City CPI Convergence in Mexico," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(3), pages 359-367, August.
    11. Nickell, Stephen J, 1981. "Biases in Dynamic Models with Fixed Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1417-1426, November.
    12. Pesaran, M.H., 2004. "‘General Diagnostic Tests for Cross Section Dependence in Panels’," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0435, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    13. David C. Parsley & Shang-Jin Wei, 1996. "Convergence to the Law of One Price Without Trade Barriers or Currency Fluctuations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(4), pages 1211-1236.
    14. Choi, Chi-Young & Mark, Nelson C. & Sul, Donggyu, 2006. "Unbiased Estimation of the Half-Life to PPP Convergence in Panel Data," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 38(4), pages 921-938, June.
    15. Chen, L. L. & Devereux, J., 2003. "What can US city price data tell us about purchasing power parity?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 213-222, April.
    16. Im, Kyung So & Pesaran, M. Hashem & Shin, Yongcheol, 2003. "Testing for unit roots in heterogeneous panels," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 53-74, July.
    17. Papell, David H & Theodoridis, Hristos, 2001. "The Choice of Numeraire Currency in Panel Tests of Purchasing Power Parity," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 33(3), pages 790-803, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Christina Christou & Juncal Cunado & Rangan Gupta, 2016. "Price Convergence Patterns across U.S. States," Working Papers 201629, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    2. Ikeno, Hidehiro, 2014. "Long-run analysis on convergence of Japanese local price levels: A pairwise approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 390-397.
    3. Hiranya K. Nath & Jayanta Sarkar, 2014. "City Relative Price Dynamics in Australia: Are Structural Breaks Important?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 90(288), pages 33-48, March.
    4. Ikeno, Hidehiro, 2014. "Pairwise tests of convergence of Japanese local price levels," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 232-248.
    5. Poncela, Pilar & Ruiz, Esther, 2012. "More is not always better : back to the Kalman filter in dynamic factor models," DES - Working Papers. Statistics and Econometrics. WS ws122317, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Estadística.
    6. Hegwood, Natalie D. & Nath, Hiranya K., 2013. "Structural breaks and relative price convergence among US cities," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 150-160.
    7. David Sondermann, 2014. "Productivity in the euro area: any evidence of convergence?," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 47(3), pages 999-1027, November.
    8. repec:qut:auncer:2013_01 is not listed on IDEAS

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:32:y:2010:i:1:p:405-414. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622617 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.