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How can we better capture food away from Home? Lessons from India’s linking person-level meal and household-level food data

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  • Fiedler, John L.
  • Yadav, Suryakant

Abstract

Despite acknowledged shortcomings, household consumption and expenditure surveys (HCES) are increasingly being used to proxy food consumption because they are relatively more available and affordable than surveys using more precise dietary assessment methods. One of the most common, significant sources of HCES measurement error is their under-estimation of food away from home (FAFH). In 2011, India’s National Survey Sample Organization introduced revisions in its HCES questionnaire that included replacing “cooked meals”—the single item in the food consumption module designed to capture FAFH at the household level—with five more detailed and explicitly FAFH sub-categories. The survey also contained a section with seven, household member-specific questions about meal patterns during the reference period and included three sources of meals away from home (MAFH) that overlapped three of the new FAFH categories.

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  • Fiedler, John L. & Yadav, Suryakant, 2017. "How can we better capture food away from Home? Lessons from India’s linking person-level meal and household-level food data," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 81-93.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:72:y:2017:i:c:p:81-93
    DOI: 10.1016/j.foodpol.2017.08.015
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Bhuyan, Biswabhusan & Sahoo, Bimal Kishore & Suar, Damodar, 2020. "Nutritional status, poverty, and relative deprivation among socio-economic and gender groups in India: Is the growth inclusive?," World Development Perspectives, Elsevier, vol. 18(C).
    3. Zezza, Alberto & Carletto, Calogero & Fiedler, John L. & Gennari, Pietro & Jolliffe, Dean, 2017. "Food counts. Measuring food consumption and expenditures in household consumption and expenditure surveys (HCES). Introduction to the special issue," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 1-6.
    4. Cockx, Lara & Colen, Liesbeth & De Weerdt, Joachim, 2018. "From corn to popcorn? Urbanization and dietary change: Evidence from rural-urban migrants in Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 140-159.
    5. Deepthi E. Kolady & Shivendra Kumar Srivastava & David Just & Jaspal Singh, 2021. "Food away from home and the reversal of the calorie intake decline in India," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 13(2), pages 369-384, April.
    6. Mwangi, Dena M. & Fiedler, John L. & Sununtnasuk, Celeste, 2017. "Imputing nutrient intake from foods prepared and consumed away from home and other composite foods: Exploring extensions of the Subramanian–Deaton cost per calorie approach," IFPRI discussion papers 1596, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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