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The sustainability and resilience of global water and food systems: Political analysis of the interplay between security, resource scarcity, political systems and global trade

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  • Allouche, Jeremy

Abstract

This article looks at the interrelationship between water and food security. More specifically, it examines the resilience and sustainability of water and food systems to shocks and stresses linked to different levels and intensity of conflict, global trade and climate change. The article makes four points: (1) that resource scarcity as a driver of conflict is inconclusive especially at regional and national levels (2) most insecurities surrounding water and food are explained by political power, social and gender relations; (3) global trade has enabled national food and water security, but that is now threatened by increasing food prices, food sovereignty movements and land ‘grabbing’ (4) and that water and food security will face major challenges under conditions of climate change.

Suggested Citation

  • Allouche, Jeremy, 2011. "The sustainability and resilience of global water and food systems: Political analysis of the interplay between security, resource scarcity, political systems and global trade," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(S1), pages 3-8.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:36:y:2011:i:s1:p:s3-s8
    DOI: 10.1016/j.foodpol.2010.11.013
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. M. Ataman Aksoy & John C. Beghin, 2005. "Global Agricultural Trade and Developing Countries," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7464.
    2. Piesse, Jenifer & Thirtle, Colin, 2009. "Three bubbles and a panic: An explanatory review of recent food commodity price events," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 119-129, April.
    3. Wenche Hauge & Tanja Ellingsen, 1998. "Beyond Environmental Scarcity: Causal Pathways to Conflict," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 35(3), pages 299-317, May.
    4. Henrik Urdal, 2005. "People vs. Malthus: Population Pressure, Environmental Degradation, and Armed Conflict Revisited," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 42(4), pages 417-434, July.
    5. Duncan A. Thomas & Roger R. Ford, 2005. "The Crisis of Innovation in Water and Wastewater," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 3282, April.
    6. Benson, Todd & Minot, Nicholas & Pender, John & Robles, Miguel & von Braun, Joachim, 2008. "Global food crises: Monitoring and assessing impact to inform policy responses," Food policy reports 19, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Hanjra, Munir A. & Qureshi, M. Ejaz, 2010. "Global water crisis and future food security in an era of climate change," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 365-377, October.
    8. Smith, Lisa C. & Haddad, Lawrence James, 2000. "Explaining child malnutrition in developing countries: a cross-country analysis," Research reports 111, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Cited by:

    1. R. Quentin Grafton & Mahala McLindin & Karen Hussey & Paul Wyrwoll & Dennis Wichelns & Claudia Ringler & Dustin Garrick & Jamie Pittock & Sarah Wheeler & Stuart Orr & Nathanial Matthews & Erik Ansink , 2016. "Responding to Global Challenges in Food, Energy, Environment and Water: Risks and Options Assessment for Decision-Making," Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(2), pages 275-299, May.
    2. Hassani-Mahmooei, Behrooz & Parris, Brett W., 2013. "Resource scarcity, effort allocation and environmental security: An agent-based theoretical approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 183-192.
    3. Moon, Wanki, 2011. "Is agriculture compatible with free trade?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 13-24.
    4. Lisa Mason & T. Agan, 2015. "Weather variability in urban Philippines: a gender analysis of household impacts," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 132(4), pages 589-599, October.
    5. Roberto Roson & Martina Sartori, 2013. "Trade-offs in water policy: System-wide implications of changing water availability and agricultural productivity in the Mediterranean economies by 2050," Working Papers 2013:21, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    6. Fazlullah Akhtar & Bernhard Tischbein & Usman Awan, 2013. "Optimizing Deficit Irrigation Scheduling Under Shallow Groundwater Conditions in Lower Reaches of Amu Darya River Basin," Water Resources Management: An International Journal, Published for the European Water Resources Association (EWRA), Springer;European Water Resources Association (EWRA), vol. 27(8), pages 3165-3178, June.
    7. Sartori, Martina & Schiavo, Stefano, 2015. "Connected we stand: A network perspective on trade and global food security," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 114-127.
    8. Ozturk, Ilhan, 2015. "Sustainability in the food-energy-water nexus: Evidence from BRICS (Brazil, the Russian Federation, India, China, and South Africa) countries," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 93(P1), pages 999-1010.
    9. Foran, Tira & Butler, James R.A. & Williams, Liana J. & Wanjura, Wolf J. & Hall, Andy & Carter, Lucy & Carberry, Peter S., 2014. "Taking Complexity in Food Systems Seriously: An Interdisciplinary Analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 85-101.

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