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The sustainability and resilience of global water and food systems: Political analysis of the interplay between security, resource scarcity, political systems and global trade

  • Allouche, Jeremy
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    This article looks at the interrelationship between water and food security. More specifically, it examines the resilience and sustainability of water and food systems to shocks and stresses linked to different levels and intensity of conflict, global trade and climate change. The article makes four points: (1) that resource scarcity as a driver of conflict is inconclusive especially at regional and national levels (2) most insecurities surrounding water and food are explained by political power, social and gender relations; (3) global trade has enabled national food and water security, but that is now threatened by increasing food prices, food sovereignty movements and land ‘grabbing’ (4) and that water and food security will face major challenges under conditions of climate change.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306919210001272
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Food Policy.

    Volume (Year): 36 (2011)
    Issue (Month): S1 ()
    Pages: S3-S8

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:36:y:2011:i:s1:p:s3-s8
    DOI: 10.1016/j.foodpol.2010.11.013
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foodpol

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    1. Hanjra, Munir A. & Qureshi, M. Ejaz, 2010. "Global water crisis and future food security in an era of climate change," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 365-377, October.
    2. Wenche Hauge & Tanja Ellingsen, 1998. "Beyond Environmental Scarcity: Causal Pathways to Conflict," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 35(3), pages 299-317, May.
    3. Smith, Lisa C. & Haddad, Lawrence James, 2000. "Explaining child malnutrition in developing countries: a cross-country analysis," Research reports 111, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Benson, Todd & Minot, Nicholas & Pender, John & Robles, Miguel & von Braun, Joachim, 2008. "Global food crises: Monitoring and assessing impact to inform policy responses," Food policy reports 19, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Duncan A. Thomas & Roger R. Ford, 2005. "The Crisis of Innovation in Water and Wastewater," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 3282, 10.
    6. M. Ataman Aksoy & John C. Beghin, 2005. "Global Agricultural Trade and Developing Countries," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7464.
    7. Piesse, Jenifer & Thirtle, Colin, 2009. "Three bubbles and a panic: An explanatory review of recent food commodity price events," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 119-129, April.
    8. Henrik Urdal, 2005. "People vs. Malthus: Population Pressure, Environmental Degradation, and Armed Conflict Revisited," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 42(4), pages 417-434, July.
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