IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jfpoli/v35y2010i5p463-470.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Melamine in milk products in China: Examining the factors that led to deliberate use of the contaminant

Author

Listed:
  • Xiu, Changbai
  • Klein, K.K.

Abstract

On September 11, 2008, the Chinese government announced a recall of infant milk powder that was tainted by melamine, a chemical usually used in plastics. Consumption of melamine caused infants to develop kidney stones which, if left untreated, could cause renal failure and death. More than 290,000 people (most of them infant children) were poisoned and at least six babies are confirmed to have died from ingesting the melamine contaminated infant milk powder. The Chinese government imposed very high penalties on people and companies involved in the melamine scandal, including lifetime prison sentences and even executions. The problems in China's dairy industry were a result of rapid growth fueled by large investments from multinational dairy firms, development of a highly modern and concentrated processing sector that obtained its raw materials from millions of small, poor and uneducated traditional farmers and government support and encouragement for growth but with little emphasis on inspection and safety issues. The melamine crisis prompted the Chinese government to bring in a new food safety law, mandate regular inspections of all companies involved in the food business with no exemptions and set new allowable tolerances for melamine in dairy products.

Suggested Citation

  • Xiu, Changbai & Klein, K.K., 2010. "Melamine in milk products in China: Examining the factors that led to deliberate use of the contaminant," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 463-470, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:35:y:2010:i:5:p:463-470
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306-9192(10)00054-0
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Beghin, John C., 2006. "Evolving dairy markets in Asia: Recent findings and implications," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 195-200, June.
    2. Hennessy, David A. & Roosen, Jutta & Jensen, Helen H., 2003. "Systemic failure in the provision of safe food," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 77-96, February.
    3. Frank Fuller & John Beghin & Scott Rozelle, 2007. "Consumption of dairy products in urban China: results from Beijing, Shangai and Guangzhou," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 51(4), pages 459-474, December.
    4. Gale, H. Frederick, Jr. & Hu, Dinghuan, 2009. "Supply Chain Issues in China’s Milk Adulteration Incident," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51613, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Holleran, Erin & Bredahl, Maury E. & Zaibet, Lokman, 1999. "Private incentives for adopting food safety and quality assurance," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 669-683, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Tao, Hongjun & Luckstead, Jeff & Zhao, Liang & Xie, Chaoping, 2016. "Estimating Restrictiveness of SPS Measures for China's Dairy Imports," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 19(B).
    2. Minten, Bart & Assefa, Thomas & Hirvonen, Kalle, 2017. "Can Agricultural Traders be Trusted? Evidence from Coffee in Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 77-88.
    3. Yubao Cui & Luca Cacciolatti & Patrick Woock & Yinghua Liu & Xuehe Zhang, 2016. "A Qualitative Exploratory Investigation on the Purchase Intention of Consumers Affected by Long-term Negative Advertising: A Case from the Chinese Milk Sector," ECONOMIA AGRO-ALIMENTARE, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 18(3), pages 263-282.
    4. Junfei Bai & Jill J. McCluskey & Hainan Wang & Shi Min, 2014. "Dietary Globalization in Chinese Breakfasts," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 62(3), pages 325-341, September.
    5. Zhong, Zhen & Chen, Shufen & Kong, Xiangzhi & Tracy, Megan, 2014. "Why improving agrifood quality is difficult in China: Evidence from dairy industry," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 74-83.
    6. Kong, Dongmin, 2012. "Does corporate social responsibility matter in the food industry? Evidence from a nature experiment in China," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 323-334.
    7. Manning, Louise & Soon, Jan Mei, 2014. "Developing systems to control food adulteration," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(P1), pages 23-32.
    8. Scott, Steffanie & Si, Zhenzhong & Schumilas, Theresa & Chen, Aijuan, 2014. "Contradictions in state- and civil society-driven developments in China’s ecological agriculture sector," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 158-166.
    9. Dai, Yunhao & Kong, Dongmin & Wang, Maobin, 2013. "Investor reactions to food safety incidents: Evidence from the Chinese milk industry2We thank Colin Poulton (Managing Editor), two anonymous referees, Martin Qiu, Shasha Liu, and Yan Sheng for helpful," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 23-31.
    10. Geng, Wei & Trienekens, Jacques & Wubben, Emiel F.M., 2013. "Improving Food Safety within China’s Dairy Chain: Key Issues of Compliance with QA Standards," International Journal on Food System Dynamics, International Center for Management, Communication, and Research, vol. 4(2).

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:35:y:2010:i:5:p:463-470. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foodpol .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.