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Interdependent preference models as a theory of intentions

Listed author(s):
  • Gul, Faruk
  • Pesendorfer, Wolfgang
Registered author(s):

    We provide a preference framework for situations in which “intentions matter.” A behavioral type describes the individual's observable characteristics and the individual's personality. We define a canonical behavioral type space and provide a condition that identifies collections of behavioral types that are equivalent to components of the canonical type space. We also develop a reciprocity model within our framework and show how it enables us to distinguish between strategic (or instrumental) generosity and true generosity.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022053116300205
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Theory.

    Volume (Year): 165 (2016)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 179-208

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jetheo:v:165:y:2016:i:c:p:179-208
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jet.2016.04.009
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622869

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    8. Segal, Uzi & Sobel, Joel, 2007. "Tit for tat: Foundations of preferences for reciprocity in strategic settings," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 136(1), pages 197-216, September.
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    12. Adam Brandenburger & Eddie Dekel, 2014. "Hierarchies of Beliefs and Common Knowledge," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: The Language of Game Theory Putting Epistemics into the Mathematics of Games, chapter 2, pages 31-41 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    13. Strassmair, Christina, 2009. "Can intentions spoil the kindness of a gift? - An experimental study," Discussion Papers in Economics 10351, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    14. Dufwenberg, Martin & Kirchsteiger, Georg, 2004. "A theory of sequential reciprocity," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 268-298, May.
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    16. Battigalli Pierpaolo & Siniscalchi Marciano, 2003. "Rationalization and Incomplete Information," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 3(1), pages 1-46, June.
    17. Strassmair, Christina, 2009. "Can intentions spoil the kindness of a gift? - An experimental study," Discussion Paper Series of SFB/TR 15 Governance and the Efficiency of Economic Systems 302, Free University of Berlin, Humboldt University of Berlin, University of Bonn, University of Mannheim, University of Munich.
    18. Geanakoplos, John & Pearce, David & Stacchetti, Ennio, 1989. "Psychological games and sequential rationality," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 60-79, March.
    19. Battigalli, Pierpaolo & Dufwenberg, Martin, 2009. "Dynamic psychological games," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 144(1), pages 1-35, January.
    20. Mariotti, Thomas & Meier, Martin & Piccione, Michele, 2005. "Hierarchies of beliefs for compact possibility models," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 303-324, April.
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    24. Luca Stanca, Luigino Bruni, Luca Corazzini, 2007. "Testing Theories of Reciprocity: Does Motivation Matter?," ISLA Working Papers 29, ISLA, Centre for research on Latin American Studies and Transition Economies, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.
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