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The Language of Game Theory:Putting Epistemics into the Mathematics of Games

Author

Listed:
  • Adam Brandenburger

    (New York University, USA)

Abstract

This volume contains eight papers written by Adam Brandenburger and his co-authors over a period of 25 years. These papers are part of a program to reconstruct game theory in order to make how players reason about a game a central feature of the theory. The program — now called epistemic game theory — extends the classical definition of a game model to include not only the game matrix or game tree, but also a description of how the players reason about one another (including their reasoning about other players' reasoning). With this richer mathematical framework, it becomes possible to determine the implications of how players reason for how a game is played. Epistemic game theory includes traditional equilibrium-based theory as a special case, but allows for a wide range of non-equilibrium behavior.

Individual chapters are listed in the "Chapters" tab

Suggested Citation

  • Adam Brandenburger, 2014. "The Language of Game Theory:Putting Epistemics into the Mathematics of Games," World Scientific Books, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., number 8844, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:wsi:wsbook:8844
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bekkers, Eddy & Francois, Joseph & Rojas-Romagosa, Hugo, 2019. "Trade Wars: Nobody Expects the Spanish Inquisition," Papers 1234, World Trade Institute.
    2. Arnaud Wolff, 2019. "On the Function of Beliefs in Strategic Social Interactions," Working Papers of BETA 2019-41, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    3. Trost, Michael, 2019. "On the equivalence between iterated application of choice rules and common belief of applying these rules," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 1-37.

    Book Chapters

    The following chapters of this book are listed in IDEAS

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