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Strength of dominance and depths of reasoning--An experimental study

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  • Søvik, Ylva

Abstract

Iterated elimination of strictly dominated strategies has a stronger epistemic foundation than iterated elimination of weakly dominated strategies. In this paper I investigate experimentally whether this translates into actual differences in behavior. In particular, I analyze whether it affects subjects' depth of reasoning. This is done within two slightly different versions of a betting game under asymmetric information, in which very similar steps of reasoning can be applied to reach no-betting, or non-speculative, behavior, but of which only one can be solved by iterated elimination of strictly dominated strategies. The results indicate that strength of dominance matters indeed.

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  • Søvik, Ylva, 2009. "Strength of dominance and depths of reasoning--An experimental study," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 70(1-2), pages 196-205, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:70:y:2009:i:1-2:p:196-205
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