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Risk preference, forecasting accuracy and survival dynamics: Simulations based on a multi-asset agent-based artificial stock market

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  • Chen, Shu-Heng
  • Huang, Ya-Chi

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  • Chen, Shu-Heng & Huang, Ya-Chi, 2008. "Risk preference, forecasting accuracy and survival dynamics: Simulations based on a multi-asset agent-based artificial stock market," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 67(3-4), pages 702-717, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:67:y:2008:i:3-4:p:702-717
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lettau, Martin, 1997. "Explaining the facts with adaptive agents: The case of mutual fund flows," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 21(7), pages 1117-1147, June.
    2. Laibson, David, 1998. "Life-cycle consumption and hyperbolic discount functions," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(3-5), pages 861-871, May.
    3. Barberis, Nicholas & Thaler, Richard, 2003. "A survey of behavioral finance," Handbook of the Economics of Finance,in: G.M. Constantinides & M. Harris & R. M. Stulz (ed.), Handbook of the Economics of Finance, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 18, pages 1053-1128 Elsevier.
    4. Armen A. Alchian, 1950. "Uncertainty, Evolution, and Economic Theory," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 58, pages 211-211.
    5. Blume, Lawrence & Easley, David, 1992. "Evolution and market behavior," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 9-40, October.
    6. Holland, John H & Miller, John H, 1991. "Artificial Adaptive Agents in Economic Theory," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(2), pages 365-371, May.
    7. Matthew Rabin, 1998. "Psychology and Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 11-46, March.
    8. Alvaro Sandroni, 2000. "Do Markets Favor Agents Able to Make Accurate Predicitions?," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(6), pages 1303-1342, November.
    9. Emanuela Sciubba, 2006. "The evolution of portfolio rules and the capital asset pricing model," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 29(1), pages 123-150, September.
    10. Hommes, Cars H., 2006. "Heterogeneous Agent Models in Economics and Finance," Handbook of Computational Economics,in: Leigh Tesfatsion & Kenneth L. Judd (ed.), Handbook of Computational Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 23, pages 1109-1186 Elsevier.
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    Cited by:

    1. Carl Chiarella & Roberto Dieci & Xue-Zhong He & Kai Li, 2013. "An evolutionary CAPM under heterogeneous beliefs," Annals of Finance, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 185-215, May.
    2. Kluger, Brian D. & McBride, Mark E., 2011. "Intraday trading patterns in an intelligent autonomous agent-based stock market," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 79(3), pages 226-245, August.
    3. Hai-Chuan Xu & Wei Zhang & Xiong Xiong & Wei-Xing Zhou, 2014. "Wealth share analysis with "fundamentalist/chartist" heterogeneous agents," Papers 1405.5939, arXiv.org.
    4. repec:spr:jeicoo:v:12:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11403-015-0157-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Kai Li, 2014. "Asset Price Dynamics with Heterogeneous Beliefs and Time Delays," PhD Thesis, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney, number 13, June.
    6. Schmitt, Noemi & Westerhoff, Frank, 2014. "Speculative behavior and the dynamics of interacting stock markets," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 262-288.
    7. Yang, ChunXia & Hu, Sen & Xia, BingYing, 2012. "The endogenous dynamics of financial markets: Interaction and information dissemination," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 391(12), pages 3513-3525.
    8. Rangan Gupta & Lardo Stander & Andrea Vaona, 2017. "Openness and Growth: Is the Relationship Non-Linear?," Working Papers 201703, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.

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