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Trust in other people and the usage of peer platform markets

Author

Listed:
  • van der Cruijsen, Carin
  • Doll, Maurice
  • van Hoenselaar, Frank

Abstract

The use of online peer-to-peer marketplaces is growing rapidly. It is important to understand what drives consumers’ usage of these markets. Based on detailed survey data collected amongst a representative panel of Dutch consumers, we report a significant positive relationship between trust in other people and current usage of peer platform markets (PPMs). People who in general trust others are 10 percentage points more likely to use PPMs than people who distrust others. Also in case of expected usage within the next five years, there is a positive effect of generalised trust. Less uncertainty about the reliability of other persons, the quality of goods and services offered and payments can stimulate usage of PPMs.

Suggested Citation

  • van der Cruijsen, Carin & Doll, Maurice & van Hoenselaar, Frank, 2019. "Trust in other people and the usage of peer platform markets," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 166(C), pages 751-766.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:166:y:2019:i:c:p:751-766
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2019.08.021
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Peer platform markets; Generalised trust; Consumer behaviour; Consumption; Consumer survey;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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