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How consumers perceive globalization: A multilevel approach

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  • Merino, María
  • Vargas, Delfino

Abstract

This paper examines antecedent Latin American citizens' attitudes toward globalization, taking into account the effect of the extent of globalization at the national level. The model incorporates the effect of nonresponse and accounts for the hierarchical nature of individual opinions on globalization. Multilevel mixed-effects model estimations using both macro and micro level data show that there is a high potential for nonresponse bias in globalization studies, specifically in countries where digital access is still limited. The degree of acceptance of globalization among Latin American citizens is heterogeneous with important determinants at the country level being the degree of cultural globalization and its interaction with variables at the individual level. Young male individuals, with high levels of education, income and access to internet and international TV channels are likely to favor globalization in Latin America.

Suggested Citation

  • Merino, María & Vargas, Delfino, 2013. "How consumers perceive globalization: A multilevel approach," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 66(3), pages 431-438.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:66:y:2013:i:3:p:431-438
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2012.04.010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hainmueller, Jens & Hiscox, Michael J., 2006. "Learning to Love Globalization: Education and Individual Attitudes Toward International Trade," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 60(2), pages 469-498, April.
    2. Mayda, Anna Maria & Rodrik, Dani, 2005. "Why are some people (and countries) more protectionist than others?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(6), pages 1393-1430, August.
    3. Segura-Ubiergo,Alex, 2012. "The Political Economy of the Welfare State in Latin America," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9781107410664, Enero.
    4. Robert R. Kaufman & Alex Segura-Ubiergo, 2005. "Globalization, Domestic Politics and Social Spending in Latin," Public Economics 0504009, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. Newburry, William & Gardberg, Naomi A. & Sanchez, Juan I., 2014. "Employer Attractiveness in Latin America: The Association Among Foreignness, Internationalization and Talent Recruitment," Journal of International Management, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 327-344.
    2. Bartsch, Fabian & Diamantopoulos, Adamantios & Paparoidamis, Nicholas G. & Chumpitaz, Ruben, 2016. "Global brand ownership: The mediating roles of consumer attitudes and brand identification," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 69(9), pages 3629-3635.
    3. Iulian Viorel Brasoveanu & Laura Obreja Brasoveanu & Simona Mascu, 2014. "Comparative Analysis of the Consumer Protection, Considering the Globalisation and Technological Changes, within Member States of the European Union," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 16(36), pages 517-517, May.

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