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Measuring access to learning over a period of increased access to schooling: The case of Southern and Eastern Africa since 2000

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  • Taylor, Stephen
  • Spaull, Nicholas

Abstract

This paper examines the extent to which increased access to primary schooling in ten Southern and East African countries between 2000 and 2007 was also accompanied by increased access to actual learning. We develop a measure of access to learning that combines data on education access and learning achievement to measure the proportions of children in the population (including those enrolled and not enrolled) that reach particular thresholds of literacy and numeracy. In all countries there was greater access to learning in 2007 than in 2000. These improvements in access to learning especially benefited girls and children from poor households.

Suggested Citation

  • Taylor, Stephen & Spaull, Nicholas, 2015. "Measuring access to learning over a period of increased access to schooling: The case of Southern and Eastern Africa since 2000," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 47-59.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:injoed:v:41:y:2015:i:c:p:47-59
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ijedudev.2014.12.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gabrielle Wills & Debra Shepherd & Janeli Kotze, 2016. "Interrogating a Paradox of Performance in the WCED: A Provincial and Regional Comparison of Student Learning," Working Papers 14/2016, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    2. Monica J. Grant, 2015. "The Demographic Promise of Expanded Female Education: Trends in the Age at First Birth in Malawi," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 41(3), pages 409-438, September.
    3. Adaiah Lilenstein, 2018. "Integrating Indicators of Education Quantity and Quality in Six Francophone African Countries," Working Papers 09/2018, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.

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