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Emerging Private Education in Africa: Determinants of School Choice in Rural Kenya

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  • Nishimura, Mikiko
  • Yamano, Takashi

Abstract

The number of private schools has increased by more than four times since the introduction of the Free Primary Education (FPE) policy in 2003 in Kenya. With the help of panel data obtained from rural Kenya, we observed that the proportion of children attending private primary schools increased from 4.6% in 2004 to 11.5% in 2007. The estimation results suggest that parents react to the quality of public education, as measured by the pupil–teacher ratios of public schools, by attending private schools and transferring to different schools. Their reaction also depends on the wealth of households and gender.

Suggested Citation

  • Nishimura, Mikiko & Yamano, Takashi, 2013. "Emerging Private Education in Africa: Determinants of School Choice in Rural Kenya," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 266-275.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:43:y:2013:i:c:p:266-275
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2012.10.001
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    Cited by:

    1. Sakaue, Katsuki, 2018. "Informal fee charge and school choice under a free primary education policy: Panel data evidence from rural Uganda," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 112-127.
    2. Marine de Talance, 2017. "Quality Perceptions and School Choice in Rural Pakistan," Working Papers hal-01663029, HAL.
    3. Pauline Dixon & Steve Humble & James Tooley, 2017. "How School Choice is Framed by Parental Preferences and Family Characteristics: A Study in Poor Areas of Lagos State, Nigeria," Economic Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(1), pages 53-65, February.
    4. repec:rac:ecchap:2017-12 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Marine de Talancé, 2016. "Quality perceptions and school choice in rural Pakistan," Working Papers DT/2016/15, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    6. Elin Vimefall & Daniela Andrén & Jörgen Levin, 2017. "Ethnolinguistic Background and Enrollment in Primary Education: Evidence from Kenya," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 29(1), pages 81-91, March.
    7. Taylor, Stephen & Spaull, Nicholas, 2015. "Measuring access to learning over a period of increased access to schooling: The case of Southern and Eastern Africa since 2000," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 47-59.
    8. Maksymenko, Svitlana & Tranfaglia, Anna, 2015. "The impact of professional athlete sponsorship on educational attainment in Western Kenya," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 97-103.
    9. Atuhurra, Julius F., 2016. "Does community involvement affect teacher effort? Assessing learning impacts of Free Primary Education in Kenya," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 234-246.
    10. Nakajima, Maki & Kijima, Yoko & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2018. "Is the learning crisis responsible for school dropout? A longitudinal study of Andhra Pradesh, India," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 245-253.
    11. Lincove, Jane Arnold, 2015. "Improving Identification of Demand-Side Obstacles to Schooling: Findings from Revealed and Stated Preference Models in Two SSA Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 69-83.
    12. Mukherjee, Shantanu & Lusigi, Angela & Kamwendo, Eunice & Bonini, Astra, 2017. "Income Inequality Trends in sub-Saharan Africa: Divergence, determinants and consequences: Inequality, Gender and Human Development in Africa," UNDP Africa Reports 267647, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).
    13. Delprato, Marcos & Akyeampong, Kwame & Dunne, Máiréad, 2017. "Intergenerational Education Effects of Early Marriage in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 173-192.
    14. UNDP Regional Bureau for Africa & Shantanu Mukherjee & Angela Lusigi & Eunice Kamwendo & Astra Bonini, "undated". "Inequality, Gender and Human Development in Africa," UNDP Africa Policy Notes 2017-12, United Nations Development Programme, Regional Bureau for Africa.
    15. Arthuer Bauer et Rohen d'AIGLEPIERRE, 2017. "Explaining the Development of Private Education: the Effect of Public Expenditure on Education," Working Paper 237926bf-0d6f-4396-b47e-9, Agence française de développement.
    16. Wamalwa, Fredrick M. & Burns, Justine, 2018. "Private schools and student learning achievements in Kenya," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 114-124.
    17. Julius Muthike Njiiri & Dominic Mwenja & Kellen Kiambati & Levi Mbugua, 2020. "Financial control and growth of private primary schools in Kenya," International Journal of Research in Business and Social Science (2147-4478), Center for the Strategic Studies in Business and Finance, vol. 9(7), pages 267-273, December.
    18. Yuki Tanaka & Takashi Yamano, 2015. "Risk and Time Preference on Schooling:Experimental Evidence from a Low-Income Country," GRIPS Discussion Papers 14-24, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.
    19. Lee, Jieun & Kim, Hyoungjong & Rhee, Dong-Eun, 2021. "No harmless child labor: The effect of child labor on academic achievement in francophone Western and Central Africa," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 80(C).
    20. Maluccio, John A. & Hussein, Mohamed & Abuya, Benta & Muluve, Eva & Muthengi, Eunice & Austrian, Karen, 2018. "Adolescent girls’ primary school mobility and educational outcomes in urban Kenya," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 75-87.
    21. Soham Sahoo, 2017. "Intra-Household Gender Disparity in School Choice: Evidence from Private Schooling in India," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(10), pages 1714-1730, October.

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