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International fiscal spillovers

Author

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  • Faccini, Renato
  • Mumtaz, Haroon
  • Surico, Paolo

Abstract

A two-country business cycle model featuring nominal rigidities, countercyclical mark-ups, rule of thumb consumers and government spending reversals is used to identify inequality predictions that are robust across a range of empirically plausible parameterizations. These robust inequality restrictions are imposed onto a regime-change factor model for the United States and its main trade partners to estimate the international fiscal spillovers. The effects of U.S. government spending on foreign real activity are found to be sizable and significant, operating mainly by lowering real interest rates rather than boosting trade balances. In contrast, there seems to be only limited evidence of state dependence in the international transmission of fiscal policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Faccini, Renato & Mumtaz, Haroon & Surico, Paolo, 2016. "International fiscal spillovers," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 31-45.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:inecon:v:99:y:2016:i:c:p:31-45
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jinteco.2015.11.009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lilia Cavallari & Simone Romano, 2016. "Foresight And The Macroeconomic Impact Of Fiscal Policy: Evidence For France, Germany And Italy," Working Papers 0216, CREI Università degli Studi Roma Tre, revised 2016.
    2. repec:eee:ecolet:v:164:y:2018:i:c:p:46-49 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Jorge Miranda-Pinto & Daniel Murphy & Eric Young & Kieran Walsh, 2018. "Debt Burdens and the Interest Rate Response to Fiscal Stimulus: Theory and Cross-Country Evidence," 2018 Meeting Papers 936, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    4. Natoli, Filippo & Metelli, Luca, 2018. "The international transmission of US fiscal shocks," MPRA Paper 84207, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Markus Eller & Martin Feldkircher & Florian Huber, 2017. "How would a fiscal shock in Germany affect other European countries? Evidence from a Bayesian GVAR model with sign restrictions," Focus on European Economic Integration, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 1, pages 54-77.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Regime-change factor model; Fiscal spillovers; International transmission;

    JEL classification:

    • E3 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles
    • E6 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook
    • F4 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance

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