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Does social media reduce corruption?

Listed author(s):
  • Jha, Chandan Kumar
  • Sarangi, Sudipta

In this paper we study the relationship between multi-way means of communication and corruption by exploring the link between social media and corruption. Using a cross-country analysis of over 150 countries, we document a robust and statistically significant negative relationship between Facebook penetration (a proxy for social media) and corruption. A falsification test for the relationship between Facebook penetration and corruption is also reported. We find that the relationship between Facebook penetration and corruption is strongest for the set of countries with low press freedom. Moreover, we find that social media is complementary to press freedom in regards to its association with corruption Finally, our findings also confirm the negative correlation between internet penetration and corruption.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167624516300373
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Information Economics and Policy.

Volume (Year): 39 (2017)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 60-71

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Handle: RePEc:eee:iepoli:v:39:y:2017:i:c:p:60-71
DOI: 10.1016/j.infoecopol.2017.04.001
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505549

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