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Gender, Culture, and Corruption: Insights from an Experimental Analysis


  • Vivi Alatas

    () (World Bank, Jakarta 12190, Indonesia)

  • Lisa Cameron

    () (Department of Economics, University of Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia)

  • Ananish Chaudhuri

    () (Department of Economics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand)

  • Nisvan Erkal

    () (Department of Economics, University of Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia)

  • Lata Gangadharan

    () (Department of Economics, University of Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia)


A substantial body of recent research looks at differences in the behavior of men and women in diverse economic transactions. We contribute to this literature by investigating gender differences in behavior when confronted with a common bribery problem. Our study departs from the previous literature on gender and corruption by using economic experiments. Based on data collected in Australia (Melbourne), India (Delhi), Indonesia (Jakarta), and Singapore, we show that while women in Australia are less tolerant of corruption than men in Australia, no significant gender differences are seen in India, Indonesia, and Singapore. Hence, our findings suggest that the gender differences reported in previous studies may not be as universal as stated, and may be more culture specific. We also explore behavioral differences by gender across countries and find larger variations in women’s behavior toward corruption than in men’s across the countries in our sample.

Suggested Citation

  • Vivi Alatas & Lisa Cameron & Ananish Chaudhuri & Nisvan Erkal & Lata Gangadharan, 2009. "Gender, Culture, and Corruption: Insights from an Experimental Analysis," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 75(3), pages 663-680, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:75:3:y:2009:p:663-680

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development


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