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E-Government as an anti-corruption strategy

  • Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck

This paper estimates the impact of e-government on the "control of corruption" indicator using a panel of 149 countries with two time observations (). The first differenced estimator yields a positive and economically interesting effect. By the most conservative estimate, moving from the 10th percentile to the 90th percentile in the e-government distribution implies a reduction in corruption equivalent to moving from the 10th percentile to the 23rd percentile in the control of corruption distribution. Invoking external instruments, IV results are (statistically) similar.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V8J-4VR242B-1/2/54a8c7b8f6a2115135ffb2081f166284
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Information Economics and Policy.

Volume (Year): 21 (2009)
Issue (Month): 3 (August)
Pages: 201-210

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Handle: RePEc:eee:iepoli:v:21:y:2009:i:3:p:201-210
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505549

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  1. Douglas Staiger & James H. Stock, 1997. "Instrumental Variables Regression with Weak Instruments," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(3), pages 557-586, May.
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  6. Krasker, William S. & Kuh, Edwin & Welsch, Roy E., 1983. "Estimation for dirty data and flawed models," Handbook of Econometrics, in: Z. Griliches† & M. D. Intriligator (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 11, pages 651-698 Elsevier.
  7. Lau, T.Y. & Aboulhoson, Mira & Lin, Carolyn & Atkin, David J., 2008. "Adoption of e-government in three Latin American countries: Argentina, Brazil and Mexico," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 88-100, March.
  8. Brunetti, Aymo & Weder, Beatrice, 2003. "A free press is bad news for corruption," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(7-8), pages 1801-1824, August.
  9. La Porta, Rafael & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1997. " Legal Determinants of External Finance," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 52(3), pages 1131-50, July.
  10. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why Do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output per Worker than Others?," NBER Working Papers 6564, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Mauro, Paolo, 1995. "Corruption and Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 110(3), pages 681-712, August.
  12. Rodrik, Dani, 2008. "The New Development Economics: We Shall Experiment, but How Shall We Learn?," Working Paper Series rwp08-055, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
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