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Why do electricity utilities cooperate with coal suppliers? A theoretical and empirical analysis from China

Author

Listed:
  • Zhao, Xiaoli
  • Lyon, Thomas P.
  • Wang, Feng
  • Song, Cui

Abstract

The asymmetry of Chinese coal and electricity pricing reforms leads to serious conflict between coal suppliers and electricity utilities. Electricity utilities experience significant losses as a result of conflict: severe coal price fluctuations, and uncertainty in the quantity and quality of coal supplies. This paper explores whether establishing cooperative relationships between coal suppliers and electricity utilities can resolve conflicts. We begin with a discussion of the history of coal and electricity pricing reforms, and then conduct a theoretical analysis of relational contracting to provide a new perspective on the drivers behind the establishment of cooperative relationships between the two parties. Finally, we empirically investigate the role of cooperative relationships and the establishment of mine-mouth power plants on the performance of electricity utilities. The results show that relational contracting between electricity utilities and coal suppliers improves the market performance of electricity utilities; meanwhile, the transportation cost savings derived from mine-mouth power plants are of importance in improving the performance of electricity utilities.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhao, Xiaoli & Lyon, Thomas P. & Wang, Feng & Song, Cui, 2012. "Why do electricity utilities cooperate with coal suppliers? A theoretical and empirical analysis from China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 520-529.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:46:y:2012:i:c:p:520-529
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2012.04.020
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Yuan Yuan & Feng Cai & Lingling Yang, 2020. "Renewable Energy Investment under Carbon Emission Regulations," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(17), pages 1-15, August.
    2. Bejbl, Jan & Bemš, Julius & Králík, Tomáš & Starý, Oldřich & Vastl, Jaromír, 2014. "New approach to brown coal pricing using internal rate of return methodology," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 289-297.
    3. Leung, Guy C.K. & Cherp, Aleh & Jewell, Jessica & Wei, Yi-Ming, 2014. "Securitization of energy supply chains in China," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 316-326.
    4. Cui, Herui & Wei, Pengbang, 2017. "Analysis of thermal coal pricing and the coal price distortion in China from the perspective of market forces," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 148-154.
    5. Lin, Boqiang & Ouyang, Xiaoling, 2014. "Electricity demand and conservation potential in the Chinese nonmetallic mineral products industry," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 243-253.
    6. Lin, Boqiang & Zhang, Guoliang, 2013. "Estimates of electricity saving potential in Chinese nonferrous metals industry," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 558-568.
    7. Sumei Chen & Lingyun He, 2013. "Deregulation or Governmental Intervention? A Counterfactual Perspective on China's Electricity Market Reform," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 21(4), pages 101-120, July.

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