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Industrial relocation and energy consumption: Evidence from China

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  • Zhao, Xiaoli
  • Yin, Haitao

Abstract

With economic development and the change of industrial structure, industrial relocation is an inevitable trend. In the process of industrial relocation, environmental externality and social cost could occur due to market failure and government failure. Little attention has been paid to this issue. In this paper, we address it with a theoretical analysis and an empirical investigation on the relationship between China's industrial relocation in the early 1990s and energy consumption which is the primary source of CO2 emission, an environmental externality that causes increasing concerns. The macro-policy analysis suggests that there would be a positive link between China's industrial relocation in the early 1990s and energy saving (and environmental externalities reduction). Using fixed-effect regression model and simulation method, we provide an empirical support to this argument. In order to further reduce environmental externalities and social cost in the process of industrial relocation, we provide policy suggestions as follows: First, strengthen the evaluation of environmental benefits/costs; Second, pay more attention to the coordinated social-economic development; Third, avoid long-lived investment in high-carbon infrastructure in areas with industries moved in; Fourth, address employment issue in the areas with industries moved out.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhao, Xiaoli & Yin, Haitao, 2011. "Industrial relocation and energy consumption: Evidence from China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 2944-2956, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:39:y:2011:i:5:p:2944-2956
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ye, Dezhu & Liu, Shasha & Kong, Dongmin, 2013. "Do efforts on energy saving enhance firm values? Evidence from China's stock market," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 360-369.
    2. Zhao, Xiaoli & Zhang, Sufang & Yang, Rui & Wang, Mei, 2012. "Constraints on the effective utilization of wind power in China: An illustration from the northeast China grid," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 16(7), pages 4508-4514.
    3. Ling, Zaili & Huang, Tao & Li, Jixiang & Zhou, Sheng & Lian, Lulu & Wang, Jinxiang & Zhao, Yuan & Mao, Xiaoxuan & Gao, Hong & Ma, Jianmin, 2019. "Sulfur dioxide pollution and energy justice in Northwestern China embodied in West-East Energy Transmission of China," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 238(C), pages 547-560.
    4. Boying Li & Yu Hao & Chun-Ping Chang, 2018. "Does an anticorruption campaign deteriorate environmental quality? Evidence from China," Energy & Environment, , vol. 29(1), pages 67-94, February.
    5. Xiaoli, Zhao & Rui, Yang & Qian, Ma, 2014. "China's total factor energy efficiency of provincial industrial sectors," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 52-61.
    6. Zhao, Xiaoli & Wang, Feng & Wang, Mei, 2012. "Large-scale utilization of wind power in China: Obstacles of conflict between market and planning," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 222-232.
    7. Ang, B.W. & Xu, X.Y. & Su, Bin, 2015. "Multi-country comparisons of energy performance: The index decomposition analysis approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 68-76.
    8. Xia, X.H. & Chen, G.Q., 2012. "Energy abatement in Chinese industry: Cost evaluation of regulation strategies and allocation alternatives," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 449-458.
    9. Zhao, Xiaoli & Ma, Qian & Yang, Rui, 2013. "Factors influencing CO2 emissions in China's power industry: Co-integration analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 89-98.
    10. Zhao, Xiaoli & Lyon, Thomas P. & Wang, Feng & Song, Cui, 2012. "Why do electricity utilities cooperate with coal suppliers? A theoretical and empirical analysis from China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 520-529.
    11. Wu, Wanlu & Cheng, Yuanyuan & Lin, Xiqiao & Yao, Xin, 2019. "How does the implementation of the Policy of Electricity Substitution influence green economic growth in China?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 251-261.
    12. Ahmed, Khalid, 2017. "Revisiting the role of financial development for energy-growth-trade nexus in BRICS economies," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 487-495.

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