IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

The interaction between Electricity Disclosure and Tradable Green Certificates

Listed author(s):
  • Raadal, Hanne Lerche
  • Dotzauer, Erik
  • Hanssen, Ole Jørgen
  • Kildal, Hans Petter
Registered author(s):

    Guarantees of Origin (GO) and Electricity Disclosure, as defined in the EU’s Renewable Energy and Electricity Market Directives, require that European consumers should be provided with reliable information about the origin of their electricity supply. At the same time, the Renewable Energy Directive requires that support mechanisms be implemented with the aim of increasing the proportion of energy from renewable sources. The Quota System with Tradable Green Certificates (TGC) was established in Sweden as a support mechanism in 2003 and is, from 2012, planned to be extended to become a Swedish–Norwegian system. This article discusses the effects of Electricity Disclosure and the TGC system when working as two separate entities, and the potential interaction between the systems when working in tandem. It appears that Electricity Disclosure may create a customer-driven demand for renewable electricity, which can supplement the TGC system. In the long-term, GOs may thus influence the decisions made by investors in renewable energy. However, currently Electricity Disclosure has very low, or no, impact on the total production of electricity from renewable sources when compared with a stand-alone TGC system.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301421511009980
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

    Volume (Year): 42 (2012)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 419-428

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:42:y:2012:i:c:p:419-428
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2011.12.006
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as
    in new window


    1. Markard, Jochen & Truffer, Bernhard, 2006. "The promotional impacts of green power products on renewable energy sources: direct and indirect eco-effects," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 306-321, February.
    2. Hanne Lerche Raadal & Cecilia Askham Nyland & Ole Jørgen Hanssen, 2009. "Calculation of Residual Electricity Mixes when Accounting for the EECS (European Electricity Certificate System) — the Need for a Harmonised System," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 2(3), pages 1-13, July.
    3. Gillenwater, Michael, 2008. "Redefining RECs--Part 2: Untangling certificates and emission markets," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 2120-2129, June.
    4. Ek, Kristina & Söderholm, Patrik, 2008. "Norms and economic motivation in the Swedish green electricity market," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1-2), pages 169-182, December.
    5. Boardman, Brenda & Palmer, Jane, 2007. "Electricity disclosure: The troubled birth of a new policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(10), pages 4947-4958, October.
    6. Unger, Thomas & Ahlgren, Erik O., 2005. "Impacts of a common green certificate market on electricity and CO2-emission markets in the Nordic countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(16), pages 2152-2163, November.
    7. Stigson, Peter & Dotzauer, Erik & Yan, Jinyue, 2009. "Improving policy making through government-industry policy learning: The case of a novel Swedish policy framework," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 86(4), pages 399-406, April.
    8. Mewton, Ross T. & Cacho, Oscar J., 2011. "Green Power voluntary purchases: Price elasticity and policy analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 377-385, January.
    9. Marchenko, O.V., 2008. "Modeling of a green certificate market," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 33(8), pages 1953-1958.
    10. Bergek, Anna & Jacobsson, Staffan, 2010. "Are tradable green certificates a cost-efficient policy driving technical change or a rent-generating machine? Lessons from Sweden 2003-2008," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 1255-1271, March.
    11. Jensen, S. G. & Skytte, K., 2002. "Interactions between the power and green certificate markets," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 425-435, April.
    12. Hindsberger, Magnus & Nybroe, Malene Hein & Ravn, Hans F. & Schmidt, Rune, 2003. "Co-existence of electricity, TEP, and TGC markets in the Baltic Sea Region," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 85-96, January.
    13. Gillenwater, Michael, 2008. "Redefining RECs--Part 1: Untangling attributes and offsets," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 2109-2119, June.
    14. Dotzauer, Erik, 2010. "Greenhouse gas emissions from power generation and consumption in a nordic perspective," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 701-704, February.
    15. Nilsson, Mats & Sundqvist, Thomas, 2007. "Using the market at a cost: How the introduction of green certificates in Sweden led to market inefficiencies," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 49-59, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:42:y:2012:i:c:p:419-428. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.