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The value of reducing distribution losses by domestic load-shifting: a network perspective

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  • Shaw, Rita
  • Attree, Mike
  • Jackson, Tim
  • Kay, Mike

Abstract

Shifting domestic load to off-peak time periods could potentially reduce electrical distribution losses and associated carbon emissions. This paper provides the first quantitative estimate of the possible reduction in losses, for a situation where domestic energy demand is shifted in time but not reduced. At a likely 0.02% of energy distributed by the network, the reduction is small relative to overall losses and to their variability, giving little rationale for distribution network operators in Great Britain to encourage such load-shifting for that reason. The paper also considers the limited regulatory incentives for the reduction, and the fragmentation of costs and benefits across different parties. The societal value is considerably higher than the current regulatory incentive, but nonetheless may still not warrant the cost of action. Reducing rather than shifting load is likely to give greater environmental benefits.

Suggested Citation

  • Shaw, Rita & Attree, Mike & Jackson, Tim & Kay, Mike, 2009. "The value of reducing distribution losses by domestic load-shifting: a network perspective," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 3159-3167, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:37:y:2009:i:8:p:3159-3167
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Adela Conchado & Pedro Linares, 2010. "The Economic Impact of Demand-Response Programs on Power Systems. A survey of the State of the Art," Working Papers 02-2010, Economics for Energy.
    2. Boßmann, Tobias & Eser, Eike Johannes, 2016. "Model-based assessment of demand-response measures—A comprehensive literature review," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 1637-1656.
    3. Bolton, Ronan & Foxon, Timothy J., 2015. "Infrastructure transformation as a socio-technical process — Implications for the governance of energy distribution networks in the UK," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 90(PB), pages 538-550.
    4. Feuerriegel, Stefan & Neumann, Dirk, 2016. "Integration scenarios of Demand Response into electricity markets: Load shifting, financial savings and policy implications," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 231-240.
    5. Daví-Arderius, Daniel & Sanin, María-Eugenia & Trujillo-Baute, Elisa, 2017. "CO2 content of electricity losses," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 439-445.
    6. Feuerriegel, Stefan & Neumann, Dirk, 2014. "Measuring the financial impact of demand response for electricity retailers," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 359-368.
    7. Torriti, Jacopo, 2012. "Price-based demand side management: Assessing the impacts of time-of-use tariffs on residential electricity demand and peak shifting in Northern Italy," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 576-583.
    8. Gottwalt, Sebastian & Ketter, Wolfgang & Block, Carsten & Collins, John & Weinhardt, Christof, 2011. "Demand side management—A simulation of household behavior under variable prices," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 8163-8174.
    9. Siano, Pierluigi, 2014. "Demand response and smart grids—A survey," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 461-478.
    10. Katz, Jonas, 2014. "Linking meters and markets: Roles and incentives to support a flexible demand side," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 74-84.
    11. Sung Chan Park & Young Gyu Jin & Yong Tae Yoon, 2015. "Designing a Profit-Maximizing Critical Peak Pricing Scheme Considering the Payback Phenomenon," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(10), pages 1-17, October.
    12. Darby, Sarah J. & McKenna, Eoghan, 2012. "Social implications of residential demand response in cool temperate climates," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 759-769.
    13. Liu, Jiming & Shi, Benyun, 2012. "Towards understanding the robustness of energy distribution networks based on macroscopic and microscopic evaluations," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 318-327.
    14. Maria Teresa Costa-Campi & Daniel Daví-Arderius & Elisa Trujillo-Baute, 2016. "The economic impact of electricity losses," Working Papers 2016/4, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).

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