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The impact of the daylight saving time on electricity consumption--A case study from Jordan

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  • Awad Momani, Mohammad
  • Yatim, Baharudin
  • Ali, Mohd Alauddin Mohd

Abstract

The paper examines the impact of daylight saving time (DST) on electricity consumption in Jordan. Two types of analysis were done: the first analysis examines the impact of DST on the lighting loads based on a survey study made for residential and commercial sectors. The second examines the impact of DST on the over all electricity generation through analyzing the daily load curves (DLCs) before and after the DST onset and removal in 2000 and 2007. The results show that the application of DST during the year 2000 saves the electricity used for illumination by -0.73% but it increases the overall generation at the onset and removal of DST by 0.5% and 1.4% due to increase in the heating and cooling loads. The analysis of DLCs during the year 2007 shows similar effects as in the year 2000 except during the early morning period at the DST onset where DST decreases the demand during this time. The analysis shows that DST decreases the electricity demand at DST onset by 0.2% and increases it at DST removal by 0.3%. A possible decrease in the electricity consumption may take place if the DST is implemented from April to end of August.

Suggested Citation

  • Awad Momani, Mohammad & Yatim, Baharudin & Ali, Mohd Alauddin Mohd, 2009. "The impact of the daylight saving time on electricity consumption--A case study from Jordan," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 2042-2051, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:37:y:2009:i:5:p:2042-2051
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Salas Rodriguez, Hugo & Hancevic, Pedro, 2020. "The unexpected effects of daylight-saving time: Traffic accidents in Mexican municipalities," MPRA Paper 101835, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Guven, Cahit & Yuan, Haishan & Zhang, Quanda & Aksakalli, Vural, 2021. "When does daylight saving time save electricity? Weather and air-conditioning," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C).
    4. Fumitoshi Mizutani & Eri Nakamura, 2015. "An Analysis of Household Electricity Saving Behavior Using the Stochastic Frontier Function," Discussion Papers 2015-10, Kobe University, Graduate School of Business Administration.
    5. Krarti, Moncef & Hajiah, Ali, 2011. "Analysis of impact of daylight time savings on energy use of buildings in Kuwait," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 2319-2329, May.
    6. Christian Bünnings & Valentin Schiele, 2021. "Spring Forward, Don't Fall Back: The Effect of Daylight Saving Time on Road Safety," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 103(1), pages 165-176, March.
    7. Choi, Seungmoon & Pellen, Alistair & Masson, Virginie, 2017. "How does daylight saving time affect electricity demand? An answer using aggregate data from a natural experiment in Western Australia," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 247-260.
    8. Hancevic, Pedro & Margulis, Diego, 2016. "Daylight saving time and energy consumption: The case of Argentina," MPRA Paper 80481, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Karasu, Servet, 2010. "The effect of daylight saving time options on electricity consumption of Turkey," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 3773-3782.
    10. López, Miguel, 2020. "Daylight effect on the electricity demand in Spain and assessment of Daylight Saving Time policies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 140(C).
    11. Bünnings, Christian & Schiele, Valentin, 2018. "Spring forward, don't fall back: The effect of daylight saving time on road safety," Ruhr Economic Papers 768, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    12. Tomas Havranek, Dominik Herman, and Zuzana Irsova, 2018. "Does Daylight Saving Save Electricity? A Meta-Analysis," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2).
    13. Kudela, Peter & Havranek, Tomas & Herman, Dominik & Irsova, Zuzana, 2020. "Does daylight saving time save electricity? Evidence from Slovakia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 137(C).
    14. Mirza, Faisal Mehmood & Bergland, Olvar, 2011. "The impact of daylight saving time on electricity consumption: Evidence from southern Norway and Sweden," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3558-3571, June.
    15. Flores, Daniel & Luna, Edgar M., 2019. "An econometric evaluation of daylight saving time in Mexico," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 187(C).
    16. Bergland, Olvar & Mirza, Faisal, 2017. "Latitudinal Effect on Energy Savings from Daylight Savings Time," Working Paper Series 08-2017, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, School of Economics and Business.

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