IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pra/mprapa/80481.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Daylight saving time and energy consumption: The case of Argentina

Author

Listed:
  • Hancevic, Pedro
  • Margulis, Diego

Abstract

Daylight saving time (DST) has been actively used as a mechanism for energy conservation and reduction of GHG emissions. In the case of Argentina, the most recent experiences with DST occurred during the austral summer periods of 2007-08 and 2008-09, when the policy was finally abandoned. The benefits of DST and the size of the (potential) energy savings are still part of an ongoing discussion in a country where energy subsidies imply a heavy fiscal burden. Using a difference-in-differences framework that exploits the quasi-experimental nature of the program implementation, we use hourly data for the 2005-2010 period at the province level and estimate the impact of DST on electricity consumption and on peak demand. The main results are: DST increases total electricity consumption between 0.4% and 0.6%, but decreases peak demand between 2.4% and 2.9%.

Suggested Citation

  • Hancevic, Pedro & Margulis, Diego, 2016. "Daylight saving time and energy consumption: The case of Argentina," MPRA Paper 80481, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:80481
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/80481/1/MPRA_paper_80481.pdf
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hancevic, Pedro & Cont, Walter & Navajas, Fernando, 2016. "Energy populism and household welfare," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 464-474.
    2. Awad Momani, Mohammad & Yatim, Baharudin & Ali, Mohd Alauddin Mohd, 2009. "The impact of the daylight saving time on electricity consumption--A case study from Jordan," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 2042-2051, May.
    3. Ferguson, S.A. & Preusser, D.F. & Lund, A.K. & Zador, P.L. & Ulmer, R.G., 1995. "Daylight saving time and motor vehicle crashes: The reduction in pedestrian and vehicle occupant fatalities," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 85(1), pages 92-96.
    4. Matthew J. Kotchen & Laura E. Grant, 2011. "Does Daylight Saving Time Save Energy? Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Indiana," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(4), pages 1172-1185, November.
    5. Mirza, Faisal Mehmood & Bergland, Olvar, 2011. "The impact of daylight saving time on electricity consumption: Evidence from southern Norway and Sweden," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3558-3571, June.
    6. Hill, S.I. & Desobry, F. & Garnsey, E.W. & Chong, Y.-F., 2010. "The impact on energy consumption of daylight saving clock changes," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(9), pages 4955-4965, September.
    7. Kellogg, Ryan & Wolff, Hendrik, 2008. "Daylight time and energy: Evidence from an Australian experiment," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 207-220, November.
    8. Shimoda, Yoshiyuki & Asahi, Takahiro & Taniguchi, Ayako & Mizuno, Minoru, 2007. "Evaluation of city-scale impact of residential energy conservation measures using the detailed end-use simulation model," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 32(9), pages 1617-1633.
    9. Aries, Myriam B.C. & Newsham, Guy R., 2008. "Effect of daylight saving time on lighting energy use: A literature review," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 1858-1866, June.
    10. Henley, Andrew & Peirson, John, 1997. "Non-linearities in Electricity Demand and Temperature: Parametric versus Non-parametric Methods," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 59(1), pages 149-162, February.
    11. Jennifer L. Doleac & Nicholas J. Sanders, 2015. "Under the Cover of Darkness: How Ambient Light Influences Criminal Activity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 97(5), pages 1093-1103, December.
    12. Karasu, Servet, 2010. "The effect of daylight saving time options on electricity consumption of Turkey," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 3773-3782.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Blake Shaffer, 2019. "Location matters: Daylight saving time and electricity demand," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 52(4), pages 1374-1400, November.
    2. Shaffer, Blake, 2017. "Location matters: daylight saving time and electricity use," MPRA Paper 84053, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    daylight saving time; electricity consumption; peak demand; energy conservation; air pollution;

    JEL classification:

    • L94 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Electric Utilities
    • Q4 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:80481. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/vfmunde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.