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Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

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  • Lin, Jiang
  • Zhou, Nan
  • Levine, Mark
  • Fridley, David

Abstract

China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target for energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20% from 2005 to 2010 [National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC), 2006. Overview of the 11th Five Year Plan for National Economic and Social Development. NDRC, Beijing]. This is the first time that a quantitative and binding target has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift in China's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energy development. The 20% energy-intensity target also translates into an annual reduction of over 1.5 billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making the Chinese effort one of the most significant carbon mitigation efforts in the world today. While it is still too early to tell whether China will achieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend in energy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options toward meeting the 20% target using a detailed end-use energy model.

Suggested Citation

  • Lin, Jiang & Zhou, Nan & Levine, Mark & Fridley, David, 2008. "Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 954-970, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:36:y:2008:i:3:p:954-970
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    Cited by:

    1. M'raihi, Rafaa & Mraihi, Talel & Harizi, Riadh & Taoufik Bouzidi, Mohamed, 2015. "Carbon emissions growth and road freight: Analysis of the influencing factors in Tunisia," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 121-129.
    2. Meng, Ming & Niu, Dongxiao, 2012. "Three-dimensional decomposition models for carbon productivity," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 179-187.
    3. Jalil, Abdul & Mahmud, Syed F., 2009. "Environment Kuznets curve for CO2 emissions: A cointegration analysis for China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5167-5172, December.
    4. Zhang, Lin, 2013. "Model projections and policy reviews for energy saving in China's service sector," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 312-320.
    5. Zhang, Daisheng & Aunan, Kristin & Martin Seip, Hans & Vennemo, Haakon, 2011. "The energy intensity target in China's 11th Five-Year Plan period--Local implementation and achievements in Shanxi Province," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 4115-4124, July.
    6. Wang, Wenchao & Mu, Hailin & Kang, Xudong & Song, Rongchen & Ning, Yadong, 2010. "Changes in industrial electricity consumption in china from 1998 to 2007," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 3684-3690, July.
    7. Ouyang, Jinlong & Long, Enshen & Hokao, Kazunori, 2010. "Rebound effect in Chinese household energy efficiency and solution for mitigating it," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 35(12), pages 5269-5276.
    8. Feng, Kuishuang & Hubacek, Klaus & Guan, Dabo, 2009. "Lifestyles, technology and CO2 emissions in China: A regional comparative analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 145-154, November.
    9. Andrews-Speed, Philip, 2009. "China's ongoing energy efficiency drive: Origins, progress and prospects," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 1331-1344, April.
    10. Mraihi, Rafaa & ben Abdallah, Khaled & Abid, Mehdi, 2013. "Road transport-related energy consumption: Analysis of driving factors in Tunisia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 247-253.
    11. Andreoni, V. & Galmarini, S., 2012. "European CO2 emission trends: A decomposition analysis for water and aviation transport sectors," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 595-602.
    12. Meng, Ming & Niu, Dongxiao & Shang, Wei, 2012. "CO2 emissions and economic development: China's 12th five-year plan," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 468-475.
    13. Timilsina, Govinda R. & Shrestha, Ashish, 2009. "Transport sector CO2 emissions growth in Asia: Underlying factors and policy options," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(11), pages 4523-4539, November.
    14. Yao, Lixia & Chang, Youngho, 2015. "Shaping China's energy security: The impact of domestic reforms," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 131-139.
    15. Yuan, Jiahai & Kang, Junjie & Yu, Cong & Hu, Zhaoguang, 2011. "Energy conservation and emissions reduction in China—Progress and prospective," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 15(9), pages 4334-4347.
    16. Ma, Hengyun & Oxley, Les & Gibson, John & Li, Wen, 2010. "A survey of China's renewable energy economy," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 438-445, January.

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