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Actions on climate change, Intended Reducing carbon emissions in China via optimal industry shifts: Toward hi-tech industries, cleaner resources and higher carbon shares in less-develop regions

Author

Listed:
  • Fu, Xue
  • Lahr, Michael
  • Yaxiong, Zhang
  • Meng, Bo

Abstract

This paper uses an optimal interregional input-output model to focus on how interregional industrial shifts alone might enable China to reduce carbon intensity instead of national shifts. The optimal industry shifts assure integration of all regions by regional products and goods in which carbon emissions are embodied via energy consumption. Generally speaking, high-tech industries concentrate in affluent regions to replace construction. Selected services increase output shares across most of regions. Meanwhile, energy-intensive manufacturing, rather than agriculture, decrease their shares to achieve the national annual growth constrained by nation’s carbon targets. Due to the need to decelerate energy use, carbon intensity goal puts particularly extreme pressure on less-developed regions to shutter heavy industries. Explicit shifts toward cleaner resources and renewable energy appear to be quite important for coal mines in Central China.

Suggested Citation

  • Fu, Xue & Lahr, Michael & Yaxiong, Zhang & Meng, Bo, 2017. "Actions on climate change, Intended Reducing carbon emissions in China via optimal industry shifts: Toward hi-tech industries, cleaner resources and higher carbon shares in less-develop regions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 616-638.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:102:y:2017:i:c:p:616-638
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2016.10.038
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Guerra, Ana-Isabel & Sancho, Ferran, 2018. "Positive and normative analysis of the output opportunity costs of GHG emissions reductions: A comparison of the six largest EU economies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 122(C), pages 45-62.
    2. Nakano, Satoshi & Arai, Sonoe & Washizu, Ayu, 2018. "Development and application of an inter-regional input-output table for analysis of a next generation energy system," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 82(P3), pages 2834-2842.

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