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Renewable energy policy performance in reducing CO2 emissions

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  • Pérez de Arce, Miguel
  • Sauma, Enzo
  • Contreras, Javier

Abstract

The growth of fossil fuel power production and the consequent increase in the level of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions have set off an alarm signal worldwide. Different policies have been implemented to incentivize the development of renewable energy sources with the goal of reducing CO2 emissions. Notwithstanding the different policies contribute to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through the incentives provided for renewable energy, a relevant question is which of these is the most efficient. However, within the context of oligopolistic competition, the answer is very sensitive to the operation of the system. In particular, significant changes in the results can be observed when considering or ignoring reserve constraints.

Suggested Citation

  • Pérez de Arce, Miguel & Sauma, Enzo & Contreras, Javier, 2016. "Renewable energy policy performance in reducing CO2 emissions," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 272-280.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:54:y:2016:i:c:p:272-280
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2015.11.024
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    Cited by:

    1. Lee, Chul-Yong & Huh, Sung-Yoon, 2017. "Forecasting the diffusion of renewable electricity considering the impact of policy and oil prices: The case of South Korea," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 197(C), pages 29-39.
    2. Charfeddine, Lanouar & Kahia, Montassar, 2019. "Impact of renewable energy consumption and financial development on CO2 emissions and economic growth in the MENA region: A panel vector autoregressive (PVAR) analysis," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 139(C), pages 198-213.
    3. Shubin Wang & Weijie Li & Hasan Dincer & Serhat Yuksel, 2019. "Recognitive Approach to the Energy Policies and Investments in Renewable Energy Resources via the Fuzzy Hybrid Models," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(23), pages 1-17, November.
    4. Liobikienė, Genovaitė & Butkus, Mindaugas, 2017. "Environmental Kuznets Curve of greenhouse gas emissions including technological progress and substitution effects," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 237-248.
    5. Haghi, Ehsan & Raahemifar, Kaamran & Fowler, Michael, 2018. "Investigating the effect of renewable energy incentives and hydrogen storage on advantages of stakeholders in a microgrid," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 206-222.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Renewable energy; Carbon tax; Feed-in tariff; Premium payment; Quota; Oligopoly; Variability;

    JEL classification:

    • D43 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Oligopoly and Other Forms of Market Imperfection
    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets
    • L94 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Electric Utilities
    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources

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