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Powering America: The impact of ethanol production in the Corn Belt states


  • Blanco, Luisa
  • Isenhouer, Michelle


This paper investigates the impact of ethanol production in the Corn Belt states (Iowa, Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin). Employing data at the county level, from 2005 to 2006, we investigate the effect of ethanol production on employment and wages. Our empirical results show that ethanol production has a positive significant effect on employment and wages, but this effect is of insignificant magnitude. We also find that counties with high and medium levels of ethanol production capacity show higher levels of employment and wages than those counties that do not produce ethanol. Counties with low levels of ethanol production do not show any significant difference in employment and wages than non-producing ethanol counties.

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  • Blanco, Luisa & Isenhouer, Michelle, 2010. "Powering America: The impact of ethanol production in the Corn Belt states," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1228-1234, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:32:y:2010:i:6:p:1228-1234

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. McCarty, Tanner & Sesmero, Juan, 2014. "Uncertainty, Irreversibility, and Investment in Second-Generation Biofuels," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 179201, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Georges, Jessica, 2012. "Energizing Livelihoods: The Impact of the Biofuel Act in the Philippines," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124952, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Timothy R. Wojan & Jason P. Brown & Dayton M. Lambert, 2014. "What to Do about the "Cult of Statistical Significance"? A Renewable Fuel Application using the Neyman-Pearson Protocol," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 36(4), pages 674-695.
    4. Weber, Jeremy G., 2012. "The effects of a natural gas boom on employment and income in Colorado, Texas, and Wyoming," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 1580-1588.


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