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The effect of low birth weight on height, weight and behavioral outcomes in the medium-run

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  • Datta Gupta, Nabanita
  • Deding, Mette
  • Lausten, Mette

Abstract

A number of studies have documented negative long term effects of low birth weight. Yet, not much is known about the dynamics of the process leading to adverse health and educational outcomes in the long run. While previous studies focusing mainly on LBW effects on physical growth and cognitive outcomes have found effects of the same size at both school age and young adulthood, others have found a diminishing negative effect over time. The purpose of this paper was to bring new evidence to this issue by analyzing the medium run effects of low birth weight on child behavioral outcomes as well as physical growth at ages 6 months, 3½, 7½ and 11 years using data from the Danish Longitudinal Survey of Children. Observing the same children at different points in time enabled us to chart the evolution of anthropometric and behavioral deficits among children born with low birth weight and helped understanding the nature and timing of interventions.

Suggested Citation

  • Datta Gupta, Nabanita & Deding, Mette & Lausten, Mette, 2013. "The effect of low birth weight on height, weight and behavioral outcomes in the medium-run," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 42-55.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:11:y:2013:i:1:p:42-55
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ehb.2011.06.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Duc, Le Thuc & Behrman, Jere R., 2017. "Heterogeneity in predictive power of early childhood nutritional indicators for mid-childhood outcomes: Evidence from Vietnam," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 86-95.
    2. Pınar Mine Güneş, 2016. "The effects of teenage childbearing on long-term health in the US: a twin-fixed-effects approach," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 891-920, December.
    3. Aydogan Ulker, 2016. "Body size at birth, physical development and cognitive outcomes in early childhood: evidence from the Longitudinal Survey of Australian Children," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(2), pages 142-166, April.
    4. Chatterji, Pinka & Lahiri, Kajal & Kim, Dohyung, 2014. "Fetal growth and neurobehavioral outcomes in childhood," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 15(C), pages 187-200.
    5. Maruyama, Shiko & Heinesen, Eskil, 2020. "Another look at returns to birthweight," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(C).
    6. Møllegaard, Stine, 2020. "The effect of birth weight on behavioral problems in early adolescence: New evidence from monozygotic twins," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 36(C).
    7. Ogasawara, Kota, 2018. "The long-run effects of pandemic influenza on the development of children from elite backgrounds: Evidence from industrializing Japan," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 125-137.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Low birth weight; Medium run effects; Height; Weight and behavioral outcomes; Longitudinal child–mother survey; Denmark;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior

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